The Editor’s Desk

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“So what’s going on at The Rumpus?”

I’m glad you asked. Yesterday we posted an exclusive interview with Malcolm Gladwell along with an essay by Paul Colllins. The Collins essay is a Rumpus Reprint. Reprints are previously published essays from smaller outlets like literary journals, not available online.

Today The Rumpus.net continues to go great gonzo balls of fire. Or something like that. We got pegged in the UK Guardian, despite the fact we haven’t even launched. We’ve just published our longest piece ever, longer than anything you would think you could read online, 4,000 words! But there was no way not to publish Otis Haschemeyer’s Anti-War Poetry and the Oxymoron of Liberal Fathers. Because even though the web caters more to a short attention span audience, there are  certain minimalist works of art where it would be a crime to cut a single world. Haschemeyer’s essay fits this description, though we don’t intend to get in the habit of publishing pieces of this length. Frankly, anything really really smart and longer than 4,000 words belongs in The Believer.

We’ve also started a new column, Morning Coffee, which will go live every day at 6a.m. Pacific time and features all the links you need to start your day right.

Our pre-launch party is scheduled for January 14 in San Francisco. Performers include comedian Margaret Cho, authors Daniel Handler, Jerry Stahl, Lorelei Lee, and Ali Liebegott, along with music by Yellow Dress and stripper burlesque by Mariel a la Mode. You can get advance tickets here.

Thanks for checking out The Rumpus. And don’t forget to subscribe to our daily email list. The thing that makes our daily list different from others is that we don’t actually send one every day.

Stephen Elliott


Stephen Elliott is the author of seven books, including the memoir The Adderall Diaries and the novel Happy Baby. He is the founding editor of The Rumpus. His feature film debut, About Cherry, was distributed by IFC. His second movie, based on his novel Happy Baby, is forthcoming. More from this author →