Annenberg Photography Space Goes Digital

By

The Annenberg Space for Photography opened its doors in Los Angeles on March 27, 2009. Tucked among the high-rises of Century City, the sleek, one-story structure houses a digital projection gallery whose interior design was influenced by the mechanics of a camera and its lens.

Annenberg Photography SpaceAnnenberg Space for Photography

The state-of-the-art digital projection gallery allows the Photography Space to display thousands of images in their best possible light:

The technology in use in the Digital Gallery was created expressly for the Photography Space. Seamless glass screens and ultra high-definition, rear-projection imaging systems are used to display photography with stunning clarity and saturation. The screens provide 4k resolution that exceeds the level offered by Blu-Ray, played across a remarkable 7’x14′ screen.

The Photography Space’s inaugural exhibit, L8S ANG3LES, celebrates the breadth of contemporary photography through the works of eight internationally renowned photographers whose diverse images – architecture, portraiture, photojournalism, and art – capture the complexity and vitality of Los Angeles. L8S ANG3LES also features the work of three celebrated Los Angeles Times staff photographers and archival photos of the city going back over 100 years.

Case Study 22 by Julius Shulman

Case Study 22 by Julius Shulman

Oliver in a Tutu by Catherine Opie

Oliver in a Tutu by Catherine Opie

An Evening with Marilyn by Doug Kirkland

An Evening with Marilyn by Doug Kirkland

Julius Shulman and Tim Street-Porter are famous for their focus on both modern and vernacular southern California architecture. Douglas Kirkland and Greg Gorman memorably portray the city’s celebrities from the industries for which LA is best known, while Lauren Greenfield‘s photographs probe the lives of children who “grow up in the shadow of Hollywood.” Carolyn Cole‘s visual reports from international war zones are made for The Los Angeles Times as are the works of Lawrence Ho, Kirk McKoy, and Genaro Molina. Catherine Opie‘s series “In and Around Home” merges personal and local issues with global perspectives. And John Baldessari adds dry wit to the practice of “nip and tuck” and to “painting” one’s face in his most recent series.

In mid-July, the Photography Space will host the winners of Pictures of the Year International, an annual photojournalism contest which dates back to the spring of 1944 in Columbia, Missouri at the Missouri School of Journalism.


Steven Tagle is a writer and filmmaker living in Los Angeles, CA. He produces short-form documentaries for Current TV, and his work has appeared in Leland Quarterly, Word Choice, and Rainy Day. He is finishing his first novel. More from this author →