Posts by: David Breithaupt

The Rumpus Interview with Clarence Major

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Clarence Major discusses his new collection Chicago Heat and Other Stories, the artist's role in politics, Donald Trump and race relations, and Paris in the good old days. ...more

The Rumpus Mini-Interview Project #68: David Kukoff

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“To read,” wrote E.M. Cioran, “is to let someone else do the work for you.” Indeed, David Kukoff has done extensive footwork collecting an array of varied experiences to give us an idea of what it was to live in LA during what might arguably be one of its most pivotal decades.

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Alors, Those French Smell So Good

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Osman Ahmed sat down with fragrance maker Timothy Hahn for AnOther.com to discuss his latest installment of literary-inspired luxuries:

When Han created a scent inspired by Simone de Beauvoir’s 1938 novel She Came to Stay (or L’Invitée, as it is known en francais) he interpreted the mood of the semi-autobiographical novel that tells the story of Jean-Paul Sartre’s and de Beauvoir’s menage à trois.

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The Rumpus Mini-Interview Project #55: Donald Ray Pollock

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Donald Ray Pollock has been steadily serving up plates of mild horror since his first book of short stories, Knockemstiff, appeared in 2008. Pollock followed the explosion of Knockemstiff with The Devil All the Time, in 2011, his first novel, which also bordered on the genre of mystery, again with generous servings of darkness.

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The Life and Times of Black Clock Magazine

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The legendary Black Clock has been retired. At Lit Hub, novelist Bruce Bauman, author most recently of Broken Sleep, recounts the magazine’s history in a conversation with Jeff VanderMeer:

From the very beginning when Jon Wagner had hired Steve to start the magazine, it was clear the vison, the content—all final decisions would be Steve’s.

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That Painful Money Subject

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Os&1s Reads’s The Art of Commerce talks with Merritt Tierce, author of Love Me Back, about the relationship between writers and money:

Publishing is a machine that does what it does. You’re grateful, of course, to have the connection to it, because part of what it does is present your book to thousands and thousands of readers.

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Fake It Til You Make It

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Have you ever thought of vanishing into thin air? If so, you’re not alone. For Lit Hub, Elizabeth Greenwood investigates the pros and cons of leaving the world cold:

Depending on your budget, you can even stage a phony funeral with mourners weeping over your open casket (a cadaver from a black market morgue as your stand-in, of course) as further evidence of your untimely demise.

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What Is the Meaning of Life? Ask a Curator

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Hrag Vartanian reports on recent curator capers for Hyperallergic:

#AskaCurator day was conceived by UK-based Mar Dixon and has been embraced by many museums around the world. Yesterday, to mark the occasion, two well-known art writers (Jörg Colberg in Massachusetts and Carolina Miranda in California) decided to poke fun at the daylong curatorial celebration in their own social media–savvy way.

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Can You Judge a Book by Its Soundtrack?

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When I’m deep in writing a novel, pretty much every song on the radio or on my phone reminds me of someone from that particular book. Here are some of the ones that consistently came up as embodying certain characters and their situations…

Gina Frangello shares a soundtrack for her new novel, Every Kind of Wanting at Largeheartedboy.

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Everyone Has an Opinion

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Robert Anton Wilson—spiritualist, prophet, or batshit crazy? At disinfo, Thad McKraken weighs the pros and cons of his one-time idol:

I mean, it’s not super tough to diagnose what went wrong with R.A.W. as far as spiritual progress goes. To advance in this capacity, you have to shut off the part of your mind that’s been imprinted with the idea that western atheistic scientism is the only means of understanding reality.

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