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Posts by: Jeremy Hatch

Spalding Gray Review in Cineaste

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Cineaste Magazine has published a long, considered review of the new documentary by Stephen Soderbergh about Spalding Gray, And Everything Is Going Fine.

The film consists entirely of footage of Gray himself, either performing his monologues or being interviewed. The reviewer, David Sterrit, takes a positive view of the film overall, describing it at one point as “spellbinding,” but he complains that it gives an incoherent picture of Gray’s professional development; he goes on to conclude that the film:

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Burroughs Doc A Man Within Giveaway

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The recent documentary about William S. Burroughs, A Man Within, was released on DVD last week, and its distributor, Oscilloscope Labs, sent us a copy to give away to one lucky Rumpus reader!

It’s a fascinating documentary that reveals a more private, sensitive picture of Burroughs than we’re used to.

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Music Man Murray

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Friend of the Rumpus Richard Parks is Kickstarting a documentary short about “Music Man” Murray Gershenz, LA’s premier rare-vinyl dealer.

He’s put his entire collection up for sale at $500,000 — much of it is literally priceless, but he originally valued it at $5 million.

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How to Survive the Next Article About eBooks: Make It a Drinking Game

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Sunday Editor Seth Fischer just pointed me to this amusing article, which lays out rules for a drinking game based on articles about eBooks. For example:

“Will e-books wipe out / kill / decimate /pulverize / HULKSMASH /angry verb real books?” — one drink
Above question is lede — one drink
Every use of phrase “real book” — one drink
Expert you’ve never heard of before predicting percentages — one drink
Any predicted percentage of anything over 30% — one drink
Any discussion of book world after 2020 — one drink
“old-fashioned” — one drink

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A Little More of the Tao

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The Atlantic just did a little piece about Tao Lin here. Apropos of an article Lin published a couple weeks ago about being arrested for trespassing, the Atlantic’s Hua Hsu writes: “The piece gives you a good sense of Lin’s writerly persona—his prose is placid, spare, vaguely hypnotic, “possibly” “ironic,“ and he’s faintly self-obsessed but in a harmless, almost banal way.”

Most interesting, though, are these observations from Hsu:

“Why is Lin so polarizing?  The comments that follow the Gawker ”piece” are generally annoyed or sarcastically dismissive, which is expected given how long and gossip/link-free it is.

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12th and Delaware

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Over at Mother Jones, Rumpus volunteer and Mother Jones intern Maddie Oatman has published a review of the abortion-rights documentary 12th and Delaware, the new film from the makers of Jesus Camp:

“The new documentary 12th and Delaware, which premiered last night on HBO, presents a fly-on-the wall view inside two organizations in Fort Pierce, Florida, that cater to pregnant women.

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Presumed Guilty Online

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Today is the last day you can watch Presumed Guilty for free online, I just found out — through midnight tonight. The documentary is about the shockingly corrupt Mexican justice system, which has no juries and no presumption of innocence, and crimes are often “solved” by grabbing the first hapless poor person off the street and throwing them in jail.

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Art From Behind

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Kathy Grayson is the director of Deitch projects, and I recently found out about her entertaining and interesting blog Art From Behind. You don’t read it, really; each post consists of tons of pictures of art she’s been looking at and things she’s been doing, with a line or two of hilarious commentary for each one.

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Kolmanskop, Namibia, Slowly Sinking Under Sand

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Atlas Obscura published an amazing pictorial today of this Namibian diamond-rush town, which was founded in 1908 and was completely abandoned by 1960. Check out the description:

“Residents of Kolmanskop accumulated enough wealth to build an entire town influenced by German aesthetics, replete with ballrooms, bowling alleys, mansions, and the first x-ray machine south of the equator.”

All this and more, and it’s now being slowly buried under sand.

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A View of the Long Form

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Kevin Kelly recently published a review of the journalism website Long Form, which seeks to promote long-form journalism by making it easier to find and read articles online or on portable devices. Kelly says that Long Form “points to the best long form articles appearing anywhere in print, and also collects the great magazine articles from the past.

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David Mamet, Crypto-Conservative All Along?

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Not long ago David Mamet admitted that he is a conservative, and in his latest book,  Theatre, he attempts to integrate his newly articulated politics into his view of the theater. But as Terry Teachout points out in this essay for Commentary:

“The only unexpected thing about this conclusion is that it took the author of American Buffalo (1975), Glengarry Glen Ross (1984), and Speed-the-Plow (1988) so long to reach it.

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