Posts by: Jill Haberkern

Where are Your Footnotes, Minister?

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Protesters in Germany are dominating the news and taking their outrage to Facebook. Unlike protesters in other parts of the world, these angry citizens aren’t hoping to overthrow their government — they are calling on it to exercise more intellectual honesty.

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Lasarow to HuffPo: “Brava, Madame Capitalist”

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“We went to our writers before beginning to post last year and the response was overwhelming. Go ahead and post. Yet, less than one year later, the reaction to our possible withdrawal was just as decisive in the opposite direction. As publisher, I fully endorse that decision.”

Bill Lasarow, publisher and co-editor of ArtScene, explains his motivation for starting a writers’ strike against the Huffington Post (which we reported on last week).

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Diagnosing Genius

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Frederick Chopin wrote music in the grip of vivid hallucinations, possibly caused by temporal lobe epilepsy.

Countless artists – Edgar Allan Poe, Sylvia Plath, William Blake, and Lewis Carroll, to name just a few – have also been diagnosed with neurological conditions in an attempt to explain, in part, their genius.

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Skating with Beethoven

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In 1927, the book The House Without Windows was called “almost unbearably beautiful.” The author, Barbara Follett, was only 13.

When Barbara was lonely, the child prodigy would pretend that “that Beethoven, the two Strausses, Wagner, and the rest of the composers are still living, and they go skating with me.” Paul Collins reflects on Barbara’s career and mysterious disappearance, as well as the elusive nature of precocious genius, in his essay “Vanishing Act.”

(via Arts & Letters Daily)

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Brian Dettmer: Book Surgeon

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Artist Brian Dettmer cuts into books with surgical tools, creating new pictures and interpretations from the preexisting pages.

By highlighting the weight and depth of physical books, he draws attention to those aspects which can’t be replicated with e-readers. Without adding or moving anything, Dettmer finds “new relationships of the book’s internal elements exactly where they have been since their original conception.”

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