Posts by: Kathryn Sukalich

Young Adults Still Go to the Library

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The Pew Research Center recently released a report about younger Americans’s (ages 16-29) attitudes toward libraries. As it turns out, young adults still read books, they still visit libraries—at least as much as older Americans—and many use library services. There are some key differences between younger and older generations when it comes to libraries—younger patrons, […]

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Leaving Out the Details

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Tobias Carroll, writing over at Electric Literature, considers the level of detail authors use to create worlds in fiction. Some writers are known for sparse, minimalistic writing. Others leave out key details in a way that adds meaning to the story. Finding that appropriate amount of detail can be a challenge: Enumerate too much, and prose […]

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Why You Should Read the Comments

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A profile of classicist Mary Beard at The New Yorker describes how Beard’s career in Britain brought her into the public eye. Beard gave a well-known lecture titled “Oh Do Shut Up Dear!” about how women (in literature and in life) have been silenced throughout history. More recently, she has received attention for confronting Internet […]

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The Unteachable Dark

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Writers Rivka Galchen and Zoë Heller, over at The New York Times, discuss the question that will never go away: can writing be taught? They raise valid points about whether teaching writing is fundamentally different from teaching something like science and the rigid way American high schools teach essay writing. Galchen also ponders whether the best writers […]

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What Does Anna Karenina Look Like?

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The Paris Review has an excerpt from Peter Mendelsund’s book What We See When We Read that questions what we think we know about characters. Mendelsund points out that many of us feel like we know our favorite characters intimately, but when asked about what they look like don’t have specific answers. And maybe, he suggests, authors […]

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What Twitter Could Mean for Fiction

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Following the publication of David Mitchell’s short story “The Right Sort” on Twitter last week, Ian Crouch considers the possibilities and limitations of the medium for fiction. He admires some of Mitchell’s tweets, wonders if the story isn’t actually better read all at once, and suggests “The Great American Twitter Novel” could potentially exist: I like […]

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Ode to Malala

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Girls Write Now, an organization dedicated to offering creative opportunities to underserved and at-risk girls in New York City public high schools, just released a music video called “Ode to Malala.” The song is based on a poem written by one of the program’s participants, and honors Malala Yousafzai, the education activist from Pakistan who was […]

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3D Printing Helps Blind Children Read

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3D printing has all sorts of unique applications, and the most recent of these is making it possible for blind and visually impaired children to read classic children’s books like Goodnight Moon and Harold and the Purple Crayon. The project, started by researchers at the University of Colorado, uses printing technology to create pages with […]

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A Reading with Music and Pictures

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In an interview with the New York Times, Neil Gaiman discusses his upcoming reading at Carnegie Hall where he will read from his novella, The Truth Is a Cave in the Black Mountains. What’s so special about the reading? It will be accompanied by music from the FourPlay string quartet, as well as projected illustrations. Of […]

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