Posts by: Marisa Siegel

Stories about Sex Workers, Written by Sex Workers

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Rumpus contributor and BFF Antonia Crane has written an episode for Driven—a web series created by Rumpus founder Stephen Elliott—called “Poppy,” that is centered on authentic representation of sex work. Antonia writes,

This episode is our dream episode because it accurately reflects a sex worker’s story of intimacy and the possibility of contentment with a diverse, trans and queer cast and crew.

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That’s What She Said

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Have you submitted a piece to “Funny Women” and it wasn’t quite the right fit for the column? Have you always wanted to write for “Funny Women” or Daily Shouts or McSweeney’s Internet Tendency? Our very own Funny Women Editor Elissa Bassist is teaching another two-day workshop at Catapult, so if you missed out in the fall, now is your chance to learn from the best!

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The Real Lives of Working Writers

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Bestselling and award-winning writers Danielle Trussoni and Walter Kirn host the Writerly podcast, a weekly discussion of all things pertaining to the real lives of working writers. From getting and firing an agent, to book publicity, to contracts, to working with an editor, to writing your first draft—Writerly will cover it all.

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Introducing the Rumpus Advisory Board

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When we shared our exciting news about The Rumpus’s future last month, I mentioned that we’d create an advisory board to help us guide the site forward. The function of the advisory board is to help when we have questions or need a sounding board for new ideas, to serve as role models for us, and to support us as we try to achieve our goals: a commitment to ongoing resistance of the Trump administration, a commitment to continuing paying writers and to increase those payments to a standard industry rate, a commitment to increase our coverage of small presses and indie authors and to continue giving a platform to new voices who might not otherwise find one.

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Save Langston Hughes’s Harlem Home

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Award-winning author Renée Watson is fighting to save the house that Langston Hughes lived in through much of the 1950s and 60s, until his death in 1967, Heather Long reports for CNN. Watson launched an Indiegogo campaign to rescue the brownstone and preserve its literary history—donate here today to make sure we don’t lose this important piece of American poetry’s past.

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Meet Our New Rumpus Editors!

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You may have noticed some recent changes to The Rumpus masthead.

First, the sad news. Our terrific Essays Editor, Tracy Strauss, is stepping down to focus on other projects, including a new series over at the Ploughshares blog.

And we’re saying goodbye to our Interviews Editor, Melissa Batchelor Warnke, who is moving on to pursue her own writing—you can keep up with her awesome work here!

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Write for Us!

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The Rumpus is looking for two new writers to join our blogging team!

First, we need a new Notable Chicago blogger. Notable Chicago is a weekly column highlighting literary events in and around the city. Ideally, our Notable Chicago blogger lives in the city and is already familiar with the literary scene and events happening around town.

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American Writers on Donald Trump

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American writers have issued a statement on Donald Trump’s candidacy for the Presidency of the United States. They are asking writers across the country to sign a petition signifying their agreement with the statement, which begins:

Because, as writers, we are particularly aware of the many ways that language can be abused in the name of power;

And goes on to address many concerns Americans share about a potential Trump presidency.

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Independent Bookstore Day: Q&A with Lauren Groff

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Tomorrow, Independent Bookstore Day will mark its second year of celebrating independent bookstores nationwide, with literary parties around the country. In cities and towns throughout the country, participating independent bookstores will host unique literary parties, including readings, raffles, scavenger hunts, story times, music, food trucks, and literary trivia.

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Write for Us!

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The Rumpus is looking for new bloggers!

We need 1-2 volunteer bloggers to help out with the Rumpus blog on an ongoing, weekly basis. Send a brief email with relevant experience and a sample Rumpus blog post to [email protected] for more information.

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Meet Our New Rumpus Interviews Editor!

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We are sad to announce that Ben Pfeiffer, who has been working with The Rumpus for nearly two years, first as Assistant Interviews Editor and then as Interviews Editor, will be moving on to work on personal projects. Ben has been an integral part of the site, making sure to keep our Interviews section running smoothly and more importantly, making sure we are interviewing interesting, diverse, and unique writers and artists.

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Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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First, in the Saturday Essay, Cindy Lamothe writes about Central American street gangs, folklore, and how “more than a decade’s worth of war [has] left El Salvador in an aggressive tailspin of poverty and violence.”

Then, Ryan Werner reviews poet Katie Schmid’s collection, forget me / hit me / let me drink great quantities of clear, evil liquor, writing that Schmid’s poems are “a love letter, one that reaches out in blind bravery to the isolated bittersweetness of the Midwest and the women who circle around—or are circled around by—manhood.”

Finally, in the Sunday Essay, Ariel Gore offers us a beautiful, if heart-rending, essay about cycles of violence as she takes us from her childhood with a troubled father to the present, where she finds herself raising a child of her own with another troubled father in, and out, of the picture.

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Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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First, Brandon Hicks brings us an illustrated retrospective of the works of Franklin “Boobs & Butt” Barber.

Then, in the Saturday Rumpus Review of Todd Haynes’s movie Carol, Sean Donovan considers how this new film fits into Haynes’s other works that focus on the 1950s, writing, “Until Carol, Haynes’s examination of queer sexuality and fifties culture has been rooted in detached, postmodern explorations of the fifties.” He concludes that, “perhaps Carol is the fifties, for real this time.”

Meanwhile, Heather Partington reviews Rus Like Everyone Else, Bette Adriaanse’s debut novel from Unnamed Press.

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