Posts by: Sarah Edwards

The Loneliest Whale In The Ocean

By

Somewhere in the Pacific ocean, a whale of unprecedented size is swimming around and calling out to other whales, with no response. This is the “52 Blue” whale, subject of worldwide devotion and fascination and a beautiful new essay on being alone from Leslie Jamison. You can (and should!) read an excerpt on Slate. One marine-mammal […]

...more

The Last Laugh

By

Memoirist (and former editor-at-large of McSweeney’s) Sean Wilsey talks to The Atlantic about his essay collection, More Curious, and why humor writing resonates: I think there’s something dishonest about writing that isn’t funny. I can’t engage with a piece of work without an element of humor to it. Laughter and levity are important aspects of human life, even at its darkest, […]

...more

The Bookstores Will Survive

By

A bright spot in the midst of all the back-and-forth in the Amazon battle—Kate Brittain, at The Morning News, writes about the state of independent bookstores: I began my search in a nervous mood. But as I entered name after name into the database, wandering virtually into every store I could discover between our shining seas, I […]

...more

For Sale: John Cheever’s Magical Suburban Home

By

Alexander Nazaryan’s Newsweek essay about John Cheever’s home (for sale, in Ossining) is more than a real estate ad; it’s a beautiful homage to the suburbanite writer. Upon touring the house with Susan, Cheever’s daughter, Nazaryan writes:  I kept asking the one question obviously worth asking—What was it like here?—and she kept wracking her mind and returned […]

...more

Away, But Not Away

By

How can writers get a room of their own, literally or figuratively? In Away, an essay in the summer issue of the Virginia Quarterly Review, Roxana Robinson writes about carving out private space in the midst of being over-saturated by the world around you: You can call it a blessing, I suppose: You’re never bored. You’re always interested […]

...more

Turned Out I Wanted A Snack

By

In the newest installment of the Believer‘s interview series, What Would Twitter Do?, Sheila Heti interviews the reigning queen of Twitter, Patricia Lockwood. Patricia breaks down Pie Dough Disease: when pie dough (aka, a tweet) has “been to too much college” and refuses to be shaped. And also, loneliness: I don’t experience much loneliness, oddly. Sometimes I […]

...more

The Poetry of Power Tools

By

Dan Piepenbring writes at the Paris Review about the universe inside industrial-supply catalogs, which offer a different kind of poetry to readers: And so I often reach for it in pursuit of a kind of materialist awe. It makes for a reading experience more engaging, imaginative, and informative than almost anything that passes as literature. I’ve put down […]

...more

Dear Alice

By

Alice Munro’s birthday was last week (happy belated, Alice!). She’s also Elliott Holt‘s favorite writer, and over at Literary Mothers, Elliott wrote a beautiful letter to her:  Your stories provide deeply private pleasures. You are our writer, part of our family. Now that you’ve won the Nobel, even more people have joined our ranks. And I’m […]

...more

Learning Curves

By

Have you ever regretted the way in which you once wrote? In this week’s New York Times “Bookends” column, Anna Holmes and Leslie Jamison take this question on. A few early mistakes, as listed by Holmes: Inserting myself into reported narratives where I didn’t belong. Crafting long, complex sentences that I thought made me sound intelligent […]

...more

Summer Reading List

By

If you’re looking for independent bookstores to visit on your Southern road trip—or, in the absence of a road trip, want to know what Southern booksellers are reading this summer—then check out this interview with five Southern indie bookshop owners. Read up!

...more

Text-ing

By

Interactive digital storytelling: fiction’s next frontier? In the New York Times, Chris Suellentrop examines interactive technologies as used in Blood & Laurels, by Emily Short: Exploring those possibilities is one reason Ms. Short became a writer of interactive fiction rather than of more conventional stories. “I found myself frustrated that I couldn’t write multiple versions of the same scene,” she […]

...more

Between The Covers

By

Looking for a good new podcast? Check out Between The Covers! Hosted by David Naimon, it’s a literary radio broadcast/podcast for KBOO 90.7 FM in Portland, Oregon. The latest episode features our own Essays Editor Roxane Gay talking about trigger warnings, her new book, and television. Previous episodes have featured Sunday Editor Gina Frangello, contributor […]

...more