Posts by: Stephanie Bento

Native Poetry

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Over at the North American Review, Heid E. Erdrich writes about the forthcoming New Poets of Native Nations. The collection, which will be published by Graywolf Press in 2018, will feature works from “21 poets whose first books were published in the 21st century and who are members/citizen or descendants with status of indigenous/Native American/Alaskan Native nations.”

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Portrait of an Actress

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In an article for the New Yorker, Richard Brody writes about the newly restored 1967 film by Hans-Jürgen Syberberg, Romy: Anatomy of a Face. The film “offers an intimate view of the actress Romy Schneider, revealing crucial conflicts behind the image of a public figure who loomed large in the German national imagination—and within the art of movies itself” and will be shown during the Museum of Modern Art’s “To Save and Project” film festival this month.

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Zadie Smith and Jeffrey Eugenides in Conversation

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I only have a curiosity, an interest, a love, and that’s it, really.

At the New Yorker, Michele Moses shares a video clip from the 2016 New Yorker Festival featuring writers Zadie Smith and Jeffrey Eugenides in conversation about their writing habits, point of view, and research.

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Honoring Wonder Woman

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The United Nations is poised to name comic hero Wonder Woman an honorary ambassador for the empowerment of women and girls at an October 21 event, Alison Flood reports for the Guardian. The occasion, which coincides with the character’s 75th anniversary, “will also mark the launch of the UN’s landmark global campaign supporting Sustainable Development Goal #5, which is to ‘achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls,’” the article said.

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Shakespeare in Boston

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Boston Public Library aims to cut through 400 years of literary analysis and explore the pages of Shakespeare’s original writings, including some of his most famous works.

The Boston Public Library has a new exhibition, “Shakespeare Unauthorized,” which features four Shakespearean folios and other artifacts, Talia Avakian reports for Travel + Leisure.

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Reading in New York

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At the New Yorker, Alexandra Schwartz writes about the New York Public Library’s newly renovated Rose Main Reading Room, which was closed for two and half years for restorations. “The room is one of the city’s great public spaces, a shared chamber devoted to private mental endeavors, and it’s looking good,” Schwartz says.

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Experiencing FoST Fest

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“We are creating a unique story world,” said Charles Melcher, the festival’s founder. “Our tag line is ‘All the world’s a stage, come be a player,’ and this is the ultimate expression of that sentiment.”

In an article for the New York Times, Julie Satow writes about the first-ever Future of StoryTelling Festival (aka FoST Fest), which will be held in New York City from October 7 to 9.

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Paris and All That Jazz

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While Fitzgerald’s haunts have certainly evolved over the years, and some have disappeared altogether, visitors to Paris can still relive the old-fashioned glamor of Fitzgerald’s Paris. It requires imagination, champagne, and a touch of despair. 

In an article for Travel + Leisure, Jess McHugh writes about the Paris of F.

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Love Thyself

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For NPR, Annalisa Quinn reviews Eimear McBride’s new novel, The Lesser Bohemians. “For McBride’s characters … love encroaches into and alters the inner self,” Quinn writes. “The Lesser Bohemians is a love story, yes, but it is really an electric and beautiful account of how the walls of self shift and buckle and are rebuilt.”

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Writerly Conversation

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In a Salon interview, authors Teddy Wayne and Alexandra Kleeman talk to each other about their recent books, character- and world-building, and alienation and anxiety in their novels. “Every story I write begins with a different distribution of knowns and unknowns, which I try to assess before I begin writing,” Kleeman says.

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Lessons from The Little Virtues

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For the New Yorker, author Belle Boggs reflects on Italian writer Natalia Ginzburg’s collection of essays, The Little Virtues, and how the book influenced her own parenting philosophy. Boggs writes:

The title essay considers what we should teach children—“not the little virtues but the great ones,” according to Ginzburg.

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