Posts by: Tamara Matthews

This Week in Essays

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For Electric Literature, Christine Vines ably dissects the TV show Crazy Ex-Girlfriend and finds it wanting, with the notable conclusion that “We still have a problem with the word ‘crazy’ and this show, despite its feminist packaging, is doing nothing to alleviate it.”

Rumpus Advisory Board member Melissa Febos offers essential advice to writers on how to handle the demands on your time over at Catapult.

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This Week in Essays: Whiting Awards Edition

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The 2017 Whiting Award winners were announced today. The award gives ten emerging writers of fiction, nonfiction, drama, and poetry a significant cash infusion ($50,000). Previous award winners include Jeffrey Eugenides, David Foster Wallace, Denis Johnson, Mary Karr, and Elif Batuman. 

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This Week in Essays

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Jordan Ritter Conn tells a devastating story about a group of people connected around the Pulse nightclub shooting for The Ringer. [Note: gun violence, descriptions of the attack.]

Could gondolas be the next frontier for public transportation? Duncan Geere’s informative piece explores the possibilities at How We Get To Next.

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This Week in Essays

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Happy International Women’s Day! Why not read some essays if you have extra time today, starting with Dayna Tortorici laying out the reasons for striking today at n + 1.

Timothy Denevi ventured to CPAC and got a front row seat to the banality of evil for Lit Hub.

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This Week in Essays

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For Guernica, Carmen Maria Machado writes about cultural myths around large women and fighting to take up space with her body and her mind.

Woe be to those who buy the Peggy couch. Anna Hezel pens a hilarious “buyer beware” at The Awl.

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This Week in Essays

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Through her work with Doctors Without Borders, Caitlin L. Chandler offers us a glimpse of what life is like on the Syrian border for Guernica.

For Real Life magazine, Christopher Schaberg examines the symbolism of airports as “fraught borderlands” perfect for a protest.

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This Week in Essays

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Austin Gilkeson writes at Catapult about holding on to and savoring that which is easily taken for granted as he loses hearing in one ear and waits for the other to go.

For West Magazine, Laine Bruzek describes how living under constant threat potential takes it toll on many women, even when what happens seems small.

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This Week in Essays

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Last week was horrible and you need a laugh. Read Kate Washington’s imagined revolutionary National Parks meeting at McSweeney’s.

For Longreads, Anjali Enjeti tackles her perceived outsider status, even as a first-generation American-born citizen.

Read Davey Davis’s compelling dissection of the body horror genre here at The Rumpus.

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This Week in Essays

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For the Passages North blog, Jennifer Maritza McCauley discovers a connection to Rosa Parks and goes to Alabama in search of answers.

Can you go home again to a place you’ve never been? Enuma Okoro writes for Aeon on moving to Nigeria to escape America’s problems.

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This Week in Essays

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At Real LifeEmma Healey makes a well-stated case for why Periscope’s Couch Mode may be the escape we all need.

Ijeoma Oluo has written an important essay on the legacy of Martin Luther King, Jr. for The Establishment.

In our troubling present reality, we should all fight out of love like Joy Ellison, who shares their experience in Palestine at Story Club Magazine.

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This Week in Essays

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At Catapult, Toni Jensen writes a mesmerizing narrative of documenting assault and human trafficking intermixed with her experiences at Standing Rock and facing threats of violence.

At Hazlitt, Aparita Bhandari examines goddess figures and the ways that within current belief systems such figures can be both problematic and reassuring.

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This Week in Essays

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Men will not protect you anymore. At Jezebel, Madeleine Davies advises that “now is a time for fury and force.”

Mark Binelli looks into life on the border town of Nogales for Guernica.

Here at The Rumpus, Matthew Clair writes about how we must do more than simply gaze upon suffering; actions speak louder than images.

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This Week in Essays

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Bookbinding may be a dying art, but at Lit Hub, Dwyer Murphy tells the story of a man who keeps his business going strong on the Lower East Side of Manhattan.

For Hazlitt, Suzannah Showler takes a measured look at the prepper community and at the idea of preparation itself.

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This Week in Essays

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At Lit Hub, Jonathan Reiber, a former speechwriter for the Obama administration, weighs our souls and our words during this political transition.

Chivas Sandage writes for The Rumpus about helping the men in our lives to fully understand the constant state of vigilance women live in.

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This Week in Essays

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At The California Sunday Magazine, Brooke Jarvis has a devastating piece about missing persons and family members lost over the border.

For VIDA, Jean Ho shares her discouraging experience at the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference.

And here at The Rumpus, Chellis Ying writes about rock climbing in China, which turned out to be an opportunity for both thrills and connection.

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This Week in Essays

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For the office drones struggling to come back after the four-day weekend, take heart in James Livingston’s essay for Aeon considering whether work is necessary in our present age.

Here at The Rumpus, Helen Betya Rubinstein expresses a sense of dislocation that’s familial and personal in the face of our newly reinforced election-cycle gender binary.

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This Week in Essays

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Here at The Rumpus, this essay by Liz Latty on challenging the fairy tale myth of adoption is receiving a tremendous response from readers.

Malloy Owen has written a mind-opening essay for The Point providing a valuable perspective that challenges liberals to reexamine liberalism.

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Writers: To Your Treadmills!

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It’s actually a good thing for writers to step away from the keyboard every once in awhile. On the Kenyon Review blog, Aaron Gilbreath reminds us of the importance of tending to and strengthening the mortal vessels that our brilliant minds travel inside:

Build a literary life if you want it, but don’t forget that when it comes to the body, it’s use it or lose it.

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A Story to Use and Reuse

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At Necessary Fiction, Anna Rowser’s story “Breaking Down” effectively uses the subject of recycling as a metaphor to subtly explore what the narrator wants, needs, uses, reuses, and casts off both physically and emotionally. It’s fiction that makes you rethink what you’ve been throwing away:

Despite her best efforts, she was doing little to hold back that day when there would be no more land left to fill.

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Facing the Unknowable

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For So to Speak, Madeleine Wattenberg interviews writer Anne Valente. In discussing Valente’s latest book, Our Hearts Will Burn Us Down, they touch on magical realism, using multiple points of view to tell a story, and how literature can engage with contemporary issues:

Fiction requires empathy, and also vulnerability and being comfortable with the unknown.

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Don’t Touch, Be Touched

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Publishers stress that readers nowadays want to feel like they’re in a relationship with an author. But I’ve just put everything I know into writing and in exchange you pay me $25 for a book. Can’t we be done?

At Lit Hub, Maria Semple talks with Jami Attenberg about comparing yourself to other writers and the irritable nature of social media.

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