Posts by: Victor Luo

Looking for Trump in Classic Literature

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With the election putting us all on edge, and the news cycles on both political ends spouting the rhetoric of potentially unprecedented catastrophe depending on the results, let’s step back and look to literature for an answer. For example: the many aspects of Donald Trump’s personality as embodied by several characters in classic lit, from Pola […]

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How Will Our Current-Day Literature Be Studied in the Future?

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With so many books winning so many prizes over the years (Nobel this, Pulitzer that), one can’t help but wonder how our generation’s sense of literature might be described in the future. What patterns and obsessions and current trends might be considered as critical to understanding our era? Over at The Huffington Post, read some answers speculating on just […]

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Keeping Family and Writing Separate

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Here’s a question many writers loathe: what does your family think about your writing? Nosy readers gobble up the chance to connect a story’s characters and their real-life counterparts, and writers are generally sick of having their artistic lives colliding with their personal ones. At Catapult, Chloe Caldwell shares how she handles this busybody question. (And, if […]

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How One Man Pioneered the Bookstore Business

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You might know about the invention of the printing press revolutionizing the business of publishing, but what about the revolution in actually selling those published books? At Lit Hub, John Pipkin shares innovating bookseller James Lackington’s story of creating a book-selling boon back in 18th century London—he was similar to Amazon’s Jeff Bezos in many ways.

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Shirley Jackson’s “The Lottery” is Painfully Relevant Today

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With so many Americans tuning in and cringing at the deluge of election controversies, we can take a little comfort that there are incredibly apt pieces of fiction to turn to for some perspective. At the Huffington Post, Claire Fallon looks at the renewed fame and interest in Shirley Jackson’s “The Lottery” during these troubled times, and shares snippets […]

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John Cheever Could Never Be a Single Mother

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John Cheever, known as the “Chekov of the suburbs” for his fiction’s signature focus on the domestic, suburban family life in the 40s and 50s, probably couldn’t hack being a single mom today. At McSweeney’s, Jeanne Darst shares the excerpts from Cheever’s fiction that pretty much hit this head on the nail.

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The Up and Downs of Literary Fame

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While we may envy writers with books that have just reached critical acclaim or won a prestigious prize, a writer’s fame often doesn’t last for very long. What happens when a writer finds that his fame and influence have waned? Over at Lit Hub, Tom Shroder shares his deeply personal account of living in the shadow of his […]

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Even Famous Novels Weren’t Written in a Day

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Feeling like the progress on your novel has stalled? That draft feel like it’s collecting dust as it sits on your hard drive, unopened for months? Worry not! Many novels that have been immortalized in literary history took quite some time to write from start to finish. At the Huffington Post, Claire Fallon shares a handy chart exploring the […]

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Mexico City’s Budding Writing Scene

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Writing in Mexico City is like holding a conversation when you’re under the takeoff and landing path of the city’s airplanes: you have to shut up sometimes, to let the noise take over everything, to let the sky split in two before picking up where you left off. As Americans, we tend to forget there […]

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The Messy Life of Jonathan Safran Foer

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It’s not easy being a literary star. From the existential crises that comes from fame to the struggle to follow up a critically acclaimed first novel, becoming “a writer” for life involves a lot more than publishing a bestseller. Read Lev Grossman’s fascinating bio for TIME Magazine on what Jonathan Safran Foer (author of Everything Is Illuminated and […]

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Appreciating Silence

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We can best discern how loud our lives feel in the moments when we try to discipline both real and virtual decibels. As life becomes more modern with ever-advancing technology, noise builds and builds to the point where silence is a luxury. How do we describe this new world we live in, and how can we […]

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Puzzling over Plagiarism

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With the recent presidential election utilizing such unapologetic plagiarism, one wonders just what goes on in the minds of anyone who so confidently uses others’ words as their own. Marina Budhos meditates on this issue as she details the shocking moment of discovering that one of her own writing students had committed plagiarism.

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Poetry Inspires Kids to Change the World

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To do spoken word, you need bodies, you need people, you need that sense of gathering. Poets have always tapped into an unspoken understanding that language can tap into the ways in which the world works. Over at the Huffington Post, Daveed Digs and Danez Smith discuss how poetry equips children with a sense of voice that inspires them […]

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