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This Week in Indie Bookstores

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A woman met her husband when she fell in love with the man operating the Twitter account for Waterstone’s Oxford bookstore.

Bookstores are more than just bookstores, declares the Chicago Tribune.

You might not think the home of America’s television and film industry knew what a book was, but there are some great bookstores in LA.

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The Witch Hunt

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In this interview we talk about—well, Juliet especially comes correct about mental health and poetry and honesty and life in West Virginia and why she writes and how terrifying her trailers were for the book and teaching while being bad as fuck and living & surviving trauma and physical attacks and about living without the shell, without the mirrored glasses and mirrored shield and without the lies.

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Writing for All

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At The Stranger, Rich Smith describes the Till Writer’s Residency program at Smoke Farm in Arlington, Washington. Unlike most residency programs, which are expensive and require writers to pay for travel, the Till Residency is affordable and aims to provide a learning space for all kinds of writers:

Till Residency at Smoke Farm, an annual four-day stay in Arlington, serves as the organization’s centerpiece.

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Make Me Believe

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The response to [the Handmaid’s Tale] was interesting. The English, who had already had their religious civil war, said, “Jolly good yarn.” The Canadians in their nervous way, said, “Could it happen here?” And the Americans said, “How long have we got?”

For Lit Hub, Grant Munroe interviews Margaret Atwood on seemingly everything, touching on the Salem witch trials, Donald Trump, Canada as a place of refuge, and some of her million projects: Hag-seed, her adaptation of The Tempest; her graphic novel Angel Catbird; and the forthcoming Hulu adaptation of The Handmaid’s Tale, among others.

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Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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First, in the Saturday Interview, Tyrese L. Coleman talks with author Leslie Pietrzyk about her award-winning 2015 collection, This Angel On My Chest, and its relationship with real life events. The author explains her approach to writing about personal tragedy, which is “to write the ‘true’ things until the truth wasn’t as interesting as what I could make up.”

Meanwhile, in “Big Ideas, Little Cartoons,” Brandon Hicks breaks down the most difficult topics into bite-sized illustrated aphorisms.

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Writing Gives Me No Happiness

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A novel wants to befriend you, a short story almost never.

Over at VICE, Lincoln Michel nabbed the elusive and brilliant Joy Williams for an interview about her newest short story collection, ninety-nine stories of God. Her answers are wonderful in their minimalist nature, and for lovers of lists she even included “8 Essential Attributes of the Short Story (and one way it differs from a novel).”

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