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Daddy Wasn’t There

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Anyone who made it through high school English can probably recall reading a story or two about young protagonists finding themselves in the absence of parental guidance. From whence does this orphan trope come? And why?

Is this what all of us innately fear—the state of being in charge of our destinies, the only ones responsible for our own actions and decisions?

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Thought Police Are Lurking

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Cooper tried reaching out to the technology giant via phone and numerous emails, but has only received a generic statement about a “violation of the terms of service agreement”; he has not been offered any precise explanation.

At the end of last July, writer Dennis Cooper discovered that his blog, which he began in 2002 and was hosted by Blogger, had vanished.

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Join The Rumpus Interviews Team!

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The Rumpus is looking for two Assistant Interviews Editors to join our team. Gain hands-on knowledge of the editing and publishing processes by working closely with a senior Rumpus editor.

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This Week in Indie Bookstores

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If you want to work at The Strand, you first have to pass a literature test. But don’t worry, if you’re among the dozens of applicants that fail, you still can play Pokémon.

Glad Day Bookshop, the oldest bookstore in Toronto, Canada and the longest-surviving LGBT bookstore in the world, needs some help.

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At Heaven’s Gates

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At the New Yorker, Richard Brody shares a eulogy for director Michael Cimino:

Cimino’s life work is a cinema of mourning, an art of grief, a nightmare of memory that finds its sole redemption in ecstasy—the heightened perception that transforms experience into a grand internal spectacle, which finds its own embodiment in Cimino’s own profound visual imagination.

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Rooting for Folk Tales

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But the question that’s been on my mind for a while now is how and why we’ve come to recognize certain tales as perennial (and universal) and have relegated others to complete obscurity. Or, to be more exact, how we’ve codified and solidified certain interpretations of certain folk tales as the unalterable classics and neglected the cultural roots that led to their formation.

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Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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First, Michelle Marie Wallace chats with two Bay Area writers-turned-visual artists, Cristina García and Truong Tran, in the Saturday Interview. García and Tran share their inspirations and the impetus that led each to make visual art after spending many years developing their writing.

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Putting Home into Words

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It would have been almost impossible for me to resist Brazil forever. Given my love for black people and fascination with our stories, Brazil’s paramount importance in the historical trans-Atlantic slave trade and its contemporary role as a cultural and economic leader on the world stage, it was inevitable that my travels would lead me there.

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This Week in Short Fiction

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It’s July, and the summer issues of literary magazines are rolling off both the physical and cyber presses, including Virginia Quarterly Review, which this week shared a story from its summer print issue online. In “Dixon” by Bret Anthony Johnston, author of the bestselling novel Remember Me Like This and the award-winning collection Corpus Christi, a father risks border patrol agents and losing his job to illegally sell a shipment of Dairy Queen kid’s meal toys in an effort to save his daughter.

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