Other

Light Reading

By

Why do readers love to hate the Times’s Style section? While many of its trend pieces are guilty of the same transgressions committed elsewhere in mainstream media, a history of misogyny and homophobia directed at lifestyle journalism suggests our contempt goes beyond objective criticism:

Far from detailing the paper’s ignominious decline into muddy ethical waters and vacuous intellectual territory, the history of style reporting at the New York Times actually exposes some of the nastiest truths about misogyny and homophobia in the mass media: their intensity, their unbelievable durations (by which I mean “totally believable”), their active contemporary manifestations, and the role audiences play in perpetuating them.

...more

Purity Forthcoming

By

Jonathan Franzen will release another sweeping narrative titled Purity in September of next year, to the edification of serious intellectuals nationwide. While Farrar, Strauss, and Giroux president Jonathan Galassi promises a “multigenerational American epic” that will deal with the ambitious subject matter Franzen is known for, the novel’s “mythic undertone” may be an interesting departure from his trademark social realism.

...more

Professors Are the Canary in the Coal Mine

By

Though plenty of adjunct professors still teach students, the full-time, tenured, middle-class professor position is nearing extinction. Adjunct professors are paid at wages below the poverty line while the costs of the career—attending conferences, performing research, accessing academic databases—continue to rise. Sarah Kendzior at AlterNet explains why underpaid adjunct faculty is a sign of a greater problem:

But all Americans should be concerned about adjuncts, and not only because adjuncts are the ones teaching our youth.

...more

Blind Lie

By

Over at The New Republic, Hanna Rosin pens a piece on her buddy, Stephen Glass—former Republic colleague, one-time prodigy, and probably the most lucrative fabricator in recent journalistic history:

I didn’t know when he called me that he’d made up nearly all of the bizarre and amazing stories, that he was the perpetrator of probably the most elaborate fraud in journalistic history, that he would soon become famous on a whole new scale.

...more

Notable Los Angeles: 11/17–11/23

By

Monday 11/17: Cary Elwes presents and signs As You Wish: Inconceivable Tales from the Making of the Princess Bride. 7 p.m. at Book Soup.

Timeless Infinite Light Press celebrates the release of Ghost Box by Emerson Whitney. Also featuring readings by CA Conrad, and Maggie Nelson.

...more

Weekend Rumpus Roundup

By

First, Grant Snider puts us in the right frame of mind and Steven Kraan personifies Sunday.

In the Bay of Fundy, between Maine’s northeast coast and the western shores of Nova Scotia, lies an island called Grand Manan, whose windswept landscape serves as a source of inspiration and meditation for Alison Hawthorne Deming.

...more

Writing After 40

By

If the lists are to be believed, the only good new writers are under 40. It’s not just Buzzfeed, but also the New Yorker, Granta, and others who publish lists of great new—and young—authors. Joanna Walsh takes issue with this trend over at the Guardian:

Sometimes the literary bitcoin is just life: some people have more to say aged 50, than at 30; for others it’s the opposite.

...more

Notable NYC: 11/15–11/21

By

Saturday 11/15: Emily Brandt, Emily Hockaday, Emily Hyland, Emily Moore, Emilia Phillips, Emmalea Russo, and Emily Skllings have an All Emily Reading. Berl’s Poetry Shop, 7 p.m., free.

Alex Cuff and Jennifer Bartlett join the Segue Series. Zinc Bar, 4:30 p.m., $5.

...more

“Becoming pen pals with an author! How cool is that?”

By

Our most recent Letter for Kids comes from Holly Schindler, and over at her website, Schindler shares her thoughts on the program:

Does anything in this world feel quite as special or personal as an actual physical letter arriving in the mail?  I’m a big fan of the handwritten, of stationery and funky pens.  Of Christmas cards and thank-you notes that require a stamp instead of an “@” to arrive at the intended destination.

...more

This Week in Short Fiction

By

Story|Houston published a beautiful story this week in their Fall 2014 issue, all of which centers around the theme of family, functional or otherwise. “Termites” tells the story of Tamara, aka Tam or Tam-Tam, a youngish woman living in and trying to take care of/sell her family’s childhood home on Staten Island.

...more

Famous Authors: They’re Just Like Us!

By

For T Magazine, seven authors reflect on the experience of revisiting and annotating their early works for an upcoming PEN American Center fundraiser. George Saunders thinks his style in CivilWarLand in Bad Decline was “manic and abrupt.” Jennifer Egan still regrets that she failed to include an Epic poetry chapter in A Visit From the Goon Squad.

...more