Posts Tagged: Africa

Swinging Modern Sounds #81: On Cultural Preservation

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The Lost Boys had their moment in the media, but these people, these survivors, not boys at all and not lost now either, are still here, living lives, growing and changing and thinking and reflecting. ...more

“Language Orthodoxy,” the Adichie Wars, and Western Feminism’s Enduring Myopia

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Adichie is far more significant than her accusers seem to know. ...more

Caroline Chege Is the Politician the World Needs

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Against all odds, Caroline Chege is fighting for female representation in Kenya. ...more

TORCH: Growing Season

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I ask Hussein if he’s proud of the work he’s doing. He says that he is. We stop talking. For a moment, the market feels like peace. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with André Alexis

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André Alexis discusses his latest book The Hidden Keys, puzzles, chance, divinity, and the Toronto literary community. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Imbolo Mbue

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Imbolo Mbue discusses her debut novel Behold the Dreamers, teaching herself how to write a novel, and the price of the American Dream. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Raphael Cormack

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Raphael Cormack discusses The Book of Khartoum: A City in Short Fiction, a collection of short stories he co-edited and translated, the editorial process, and the responsibilities that accompany translating writing. ...more

Rumpus Original Fiction: Rhino Girl

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But these were not men, she realized. They were a cackle of spotted hyena, bright-toothed in the dark, and they were laughing at her. ...more

The Rumpus Poetry Book Club Chat with Sandra Meek

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The Rumpus Poetry Book Club chats with Sandra Meek about her new collection An Ecology of Elsewhere, writing landscapes, and the power of syntactic density. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Chinelo Okparanta

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Chinelo Okparanta talks about her debut novel, Under the Udala Trees, her upcoming appearance at Portland’s Wordstock book festival, and LGBTQ rights in America and worldwide. ...more

Writing Homosexuality in Africa

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Within the past five years, we’ve seen a sea change in attitudes towards homosexuality by writers, in part a response to virulent anti-homosexual legislation in key locations. Writers such as Chimamanda Adichie and Binyavanga Wainaina have been very open about their personal views on homosexuality and have gone on to challenge and change how homosexuality and same-sex desire is represented in fiction.

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The Rumpus Interview with Kara Richardson Whitely

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Author Kara Richardson Whitely discusses her new memoir, Gorge: My Journey Up Kilimanjaro at 300 Pounds, surviving food addiction and the trauma of being molested, and what comes next. ...more

“Black to the Future”

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Black to the future was/is a radical, dangerous, and daring dream—an impossibility. Science fiction and fantasy (sf&f) is a rehearsal of the impossible, an ideal realm for redefinition and reinvention. For Africans and their descendants in the diaspora, decolonizing our mind/body/spirits was/is an on-going sf&f project.

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Feminist Victories You Haven’t Heard About

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In a nation as solipsistic as the US, we don’t hear much about politics in other countries. This is doubly true when it comes to woman-centered movements, and triply true when those movements are in Africa.

In an opinion piece for the Guardian, Minna Salami talks about feminist success stories the Western world has largely ignored:

What would have once sounded like a far-fetched feminist fantasy – namely women forming the majority of a parliament – is a reality in one country in the world: Rwanda.

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Caine Prize Controversy Continues

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Prominent Nigerian writer Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie sparked outrage in the African literary community last week with comments she made about the Caine Prize, a prestigious annual award for African writers.

Adichie said many things in her fascinating, no-nonsense Boston Review interview with Aaron Bady, but it was this dismissal that angered many: “But I haven’t even read the stories—I’m just not very interested.

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