Posts Tagged: aging

The Storming Bohemian Punks the Muse #25: Are You Now, or Have You Ever Been, a Success?

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In America, everybody, it seems, wants to be a success. Me, too.

Recently, I confided to a family member that sometimes, in moments of deep despair (fortunately they are fairly uncommon), I find myself contemplating suicide as the most sensible retirement plan.

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Leonard Cohen - You Want it Darker | Rumpus Music

Sound Takes: You Want it Darker

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There are hard lessons about aging and dying and living on You Want It Darker that we’re not going to ever be done with until we either cure death or forget Leonard Cohen. ...more

The Rumpus Mini-Interview Project #67: Anuradha Roy

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A tranquil beach town named Jarmuli is the setting of Anuradha Roy’s third novel, Sleeping on Jupiter, which won the DSC Prize for South Asian Literature and made the longlist for the 2015 Man Booker Prize. Four older women travel as friends in search of a bucolic vacation, and a young woman, contending with the trauma of her past, finds her stay in Jarmuli tied with theirs.

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The Rumpus Interview with Jane Alison

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Jane Alison discusses her autobiographical novel, Nine Island, the value of truth in fiction, and unsubscribing from romantic love. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Connie Wanek

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Connie Wanek discusses her latest book, Rival Gardens: New and Selected Poems, the challenge of looking back at older poems, and what prioritizing writing looks like. ...more

The Rumpus Poetry Book Club Chat with David Rivard

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David Rivard discusses his new collection Standoff, writing as both a public and private act, the interiority of reading, and Pokémon GO. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Nina Stibbe

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Author Nina Stibbe discusses her new novel Paradise Lodge, our obsession with character likeability, and how she more than flirts with feminism. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Annie DeWitt

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Annie DeWitt discusses her debut novel, White Nights in Split Town City, the 90s, and the brutality of nature. ...more

Fresh Comics #9: Bird in a Cage

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Countering our culture’s disregard for all things elderly, comics have become a medium of choice for celebrating the lives of our oldest and wisest generation. Bird in a Cage (Conundrum Press, 2016) joins a growing roster of graphic novels about the elderly that explore how much they are loved, how rich and complicated their lives are, and how difficult it can be to say goodbye to them.

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This Week in Short Fiction

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In a darkly humorous new story at n+1, Jen George questions the qualifications of being “adult,” gives thirty-somethings across the world nightmares, and packs in plenty of social criticism while she’s at it. The story, “Guidance/The Party,” follows a single, childless, career-less, 33-year-old woman who is visited by a mysterious Guide.

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Translating the Elderly: Amour, The Intern, and Our Many Selves

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The elderly become reminders not of our imminent mortality, but of our ever-evolving humanity, our enduring lust—and need—for connection and purpose. ...more

Rumpus Original Fiction: On Documentation

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What is it like to be you? he was always asking, in his way, and it seemed a stupid question then. I didn’t know. I could lie better than I could tell the truth. I hadn’t left yet. ...more

Reckoning with the Bros: Trump, Bly, and Swimming in the Sea of Grief

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There are dark forces roiling beneath the surface of American life. ...more
Prince - Lovesexy | Rumpus Music

You’re Just a Sinner I Am Told: Prince & the Sexual Revolution

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It was all about desire, including women’s desire, Prince’s music. Women were not degraded. They were exalted, body and mind both. ...more

Self-Reflection

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At Lit Hub, Kathryn Harrison discusses her relationship with her reflection and the asymmetry in her face as she ages:

Time passes, months, then years, and that bathroom mirror loses its power to frighten me. Still, I find it mysterious, and even wonderful, that there would be so stark and irrefutable—so apt—a symptom of nervous breakdown as a failure to recognize one’s own face.

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