Posts Tagged: Allen Ginsberg

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The Rumpus Interview With Jeremy Earl

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Jeremy Earl discusses his latest album, City Sun Eater in the River of Light, the fruitful tension of city vs. country, finding beauty in the darkness of today’s world, and the enduring good vibes of the Grateful Dead. ...more

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The Saturday Rumpus Interview: Keith Newton

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What’s interesting, of course, is how modern life could easily be seen in the opposite way—as an ever-expanding domain of individuality and self-expression. ...more

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The Rumpus Interview with Ravi Shankar

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Ravi Shankar discusses Singaporean poetry in the last fifty years, Hindu mythology, translation, and his complicated relationship to his heritage. ...more

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The Rumpus Interview with William Hjorstberg

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William Hjorstberg talks about his new book, the heady writing days in Livingstone, Montana, being a "Hollywood whore," and the finer points of Richard Brautigan. ...more

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David Biespiel’s Poetry Wire: Primal Talk

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One of the thrills of being a writer is becoming aware of the wildness that percolates inside of you. If you’ve learned to listen, you’re able to hear it. ...more

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The Rumpus Interview with Campbell McGrath

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Campbell McGrath talks about his new collection, XX: Poems For The Twentieth Century, capitalism, history, and what it might mean to write a wordless poem. ...more

The First Bohemian

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The Public Domain Review examines the work of Elizabethan writer Robert Greene, the original Bohemian, and the first known reviewer of William Shakespeare:

Greene’s chief target was “an upstart Crow,” who “supposes he is as well able to bombast out a blank verse as the best of you”…He has a “tiger’s heart, wrapped in a player’s hyde”, unable to fully escape the stigma of first playing on the stage before he would write for it. 

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Remarks On Walking Around in Boston

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As you walk, you become intensely aware in two directions. There is the outer world, and there is your head space. It is not necessary or possible really to keep strict focus on one or the other. They blend together. ...more

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The Rumpus Interview with Austin Bunn

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Austin Bunn talks about his new story collection, The Brink, his latest script for a short film, In the Hollow, working in multiple mediums, and why some novels read like early drafts of screenplays. ...more

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David Biespiel’s Poetry Wire: Midnight in the Century

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...today’s poetry apologists for the Iraq war just keep repeating their intelligence error odes. Wouldn’t it be better, however, if they would address the horror of the failed effort in Iraq? ...more

This Week in Short Fiction

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You can count on One Story as a sort of literary sieve, distilling story-sized servings of up-and-coming writers we should know, and soon enough will know, if we don’t know them already. Next week, One Story will host its annual Literary Debutante Ball, a party thrown in honor of those who’ve published stories with them and whose first books were born this year.

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Shame and Shamelessness

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I’m more interested in someone like…Allen Ginsberg…people who are shameless because they have a sense of shame. What they’re really trying to do is to change the face of shame itself. Ginsberg was an ethical person, but he grew up ashamed of his mother’s insanity and ashamed of his own sexuality.

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Swinging Modern Sounds #60: On Mentorship

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In an empirically-preoccupied world, mentorship appears to be unscientific, impossible to quantify, and perhaps even sentimental. ...more

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Lines Like Loss, Like Leaving

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I know you understand me when I tell you this. I know you understand dead of night. Tell me what lines you’ve read so I know how to imagine you. Tell me who is gone. Tell me if you, like me, always think of going. ...more

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David Biespiel’s Poetry Wire: The Poet’s Journey: Chapter 10

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Becoming a poet means locating what images and symbols, what argument and figuration, are best suited to convey the aspects of change you most want to reveal through your writing. ...more

The Partisan Review, Digitized

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The Partisan Review, printed from 1934 to 2004, marked 69 years of cultural history in the US, with notable contributors such as Hannah Arendt, James Baldwin, Samuel Beckett, Allen Ginsberg, Franz Kafka, Doris Lessing, George Orwell, Marge Piercy, Jean-Paul Sartre, Roger Shattuck, Susan Sontag, William Styron, Lionel Trilling, and Robert Penn Warren.

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Poetry Fight

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The 1968 Stony Brook World Poetry Conference brought together more than 100 poets of varying styles and personalities. After a boozy weekend, at the farewell party, emotions (and presumably alcohol) spilled over into a massive brawl. Writing for the New York Review of Books, Charles Simic describes the surreal scene:

As soon as the fight started, Allen Ginsberg went down on his knees and began chanting some Buddhist prayer for peace and harmony among all living creatures, which not only distracted those fighting, but also startled a few puzzled couples who had discreetly retreated into the bushes during the party and were now returning in a hurry with their clothes in disarray.

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The Beats and Their Women

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While their politics and art were radical and dangerous for their time, the Beat Generation’s views toward women were not that much different than those of the man in the grey flannel suit they rebelled against. Women played an important role in the Beat community, as girlfriends and lovers but also as vital supporters of the artists—they took jobs to put food on the table, cooked, cleaned, typed and otherwise made it possible for the men to create.

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Quiller-Couch: Darling Killer

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Just in time for the release of Kill Your Darlings, a movie starring Daniel Radcliffe as Allen Ginsberg, Slate asks, “Who really said you should ‘kill your darlings’?

The answer: not Ginsberg or William Faulkner, both of whom the quote is often attributed to, but rather Arthur Quiller-Couch, a writer and academic in England in the early 1900s.

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David Biespiel’s Poetry Wire: Allen Ginsberg’s Howl meets Gay Marriage

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Yesterday was the 56th anniversary of the day that U.S. customs agents seized some 500 copies of Allen Ginsberg’s Howl on the grounds of obscenity. Yesterday and today, the Supreme Court of the United States heard two cases regarding marriage. The first one yesterday, regarding California Proposition 8, addressed the right to marry the person you love.

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David Biespiel’s Poetry Wire: First Monday in October

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Bob Hicok Says Believe Me: Over at The Believer, Bob Hicok fields a few questions (excerpts only at this point per interviewer Matthew Sherling) about his writing process. Hicok’s takes on on his own process reveal a darling and darting mind, same as you find in his poems.

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Alden Van Buskirk

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At The Poetry Foundation, Garrett Caples writes a moving essay on the life of Alden Van Buskirk, a Vermont born, Dartmouth-St. Louis-Mexico-Oakland raised poet with connections to the Beats and a love for Rimbaud.

Van Buskirk (Van, to his friends) published only one, posthumous volume, titled LAMI, a largely autobiographical work collected by his close friend David Rattray.

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