Posts Tagged: american south

The Possible Absence of a Future: Talking with Jorie Graham

By

Jorie Graham discusses her latest collection, Fast, the terrifying destruction of our planet, a happy formal accident, and how to live in times of world crisis. ...more

Voices on Addiction: The Honeybee

By

She never stopped, a bee buzzing from flower to flower to flower, collecting all the sweetness she could. ...more

Your Patriotism Isn’t Love, It’s Blindness

By

Love of country, some argue. With their boots firmly planted in my chest as I struggle to protest. No, that is not love, but blindness. ...more

There Is Simply No Time for This: Whose Streets? and Civil Rights Cinema

By

It is unlikely I will see the US justice system evolve toward an egalitarian ideal in my lifetime. But Whose Streets? does offer a clearly visible North Star. ...more

David Biespiel’s Poetry Wire: 21 Poems That Shaped America (Pt. 15): “Southern History”

By

We can’t hide from our history and we can’t pass it on to future generations. ...more

Readers Report: The New Patriot

By

A collection of short pieces written by Rumpus readers pertaining to the subject of “The New Patriot.” ...more

Peeping under the Goddamn Door: The Price of Empathy in S-Town

By

[F]or the first time, I really see the tradeoffs between privacy and honest-to-god, up-close empathy. ...more

Literary Rim Shots: A Chat with John Grisham

By

John Grisham discusses his advice for young writers, the literary mafia, and why he finally wrote a (literal) beach read. ...more

The Rumpus Poetry Book Club Chat with Nikki Wallschlaeger

By

Nikki Wallschlaeger discusses her new collection Crawlspace, why she chose to work with the sonnet form, and how segregation in American never ended. ...more

Lone Star Cinema

By

In clinging to a set of memories that fade more every day, maybe I’m also clinging to an idyllic version of my own past. ...more

The Rumpus Poetry Book Club Chat with Adrian Matejka

By

Adrian Matejka discusses his new collection Map to the Stars, writing about poverty in contemporary poetry, and how racism maintains its place in our society. ...more

The Rumpus Mini Interview Project #75: Deborah Kampmeier

By

I met Deborah Kampmeier at a workshop in November. We were two weeks post-election; the room was raw with emotion, and electric with conversations about resistance. This tall, badass woman dressed in all black sauntered into the room, and chose a seat at the table.

...more

David Biespiel’s Poetry Wire: 21 Poems That Shaped America (Pt. 8): “Song of the Gourd”

By

“Song of the Gourd” is like an eye roll at this sort of gusto about leaving the Southland. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Jacqueline Woodson

By

Jacqueline Woodson discusses her latest novel Another Brooklyn, the little deaths of lost friendships, and her work with children across the country as the Poetry Foundation's Young People's Poet Laureate. ...more

Crybaby College Students and Their Bogus Trophies

By

I’m a small blue dot living in a blood-red corner of a red state, so I’ve grown accustomed to hearing right wing talking points. I don’t like them, but they surface as regularly in my southwest Florida town as white egrets on the highway and dolphins in the Gulf.

...more

Post-Election Dispatch: Charleston, SC

By

Right now as I write this, smoke from fires in the southeastern Appalachian Mountains haze the morning. We’re under orange alert—the air quality bad enough that schoolchildren will stay indoors today. This morning the coastal flooding is up again thanks to the powerful tidal pulls of the recent supermoon.

...more

The Night Wash Jones Won

By

Eighty years ago, Wash Jones appeared as a minor character in William Faulkner’s masterpiece on American identity and self-invention, Absalom, Absalom! From a craft perspective Jones was put in for a purpose: to demonstrate the role that white working-class men played in maintaining white supremacy among the wealthiest people in America before the Civil War, the Southern plantation class.

...more

Wanted/Needed/Loved: Kurt Wagner’s One-of-a-Kind Hat

By

I try not to think about fashion. It’s more that I want to settle on something to wear so I don’t have to think about it. ...more

The Rumpus Review of Nate Parker’s The Birth of a Nation

By

Parker set out to bring a different kind of “slavery movie” to audiences. And it is different. ...more

The Rumpus Mini-Interview Project #55: Donald Ray Pollock

By

Donald Ray Pollock has been steadily serving up plates of mild horror since his first book of short stories, Knockemstiff, appeared in 2008. Pollock followed the explosion of Knockemstiff with The Devil All the Time, in 2011, his first novel, which also bordered on the genre of mystery, again with generous servings of darkness.

...more

The Rumpus Interview with Brian Booker

By

Brian Booker discusses his debut collection Are You Here For What I’m Here For?, giving characters strange and unusual names, and sleeping sickness. ...more

The Saturday Rumpus Essay: Pain Scale Treaties

By

Perched on the shoulders of generational trauma sit these two theses: suffering begets cruelty begets suffering begets cruelty, and pain is empathy’s catalyst. ...more

This Week in Short Fiction

By

This week, Guernica has a new story from author and veteran Odie Lindsey, whose debut story collection about soldiers coming home from war, We Come to Our Senses, will be published by W.W. Norton later this month. Included in the collection, “Bird (on back)” picks up in the middle of a disintegrating relationship between an unemployed diorama artist and his vibrant but terminally ill girlfriend, who before they met contracted a sexually transmitted autoimmune disease from a soldier on leave.

...more
Natasha Moni drums | Rumpus Music

A Ringing in Your Ears That Would Disappear by Morning

By

Soon, you would discover the local isle of misfits. Every town has at least one if you do some digging. Yours was The Boathouse. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Garrard Conley

By

Garrard Conley, author of the new memoir Boy Erased, discusses growing up in the deep South, mothers, writing for change, and political delusions. ...more

Look Away, Dixie Land

By

Two stained glass panels depicting the Confederate flag in Washington’s National Cathedral are being removed. The windows were installed to memorialize Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson:

They may have been easy to overlook, but their ousting from one of the country’s most renowned places of worship is a significant gesture in the broader, nationwide movement to rid the United States landscape of racist symbols.

...more

Southern Girl: Beyoncé, Badu, and Southern Black Womanhood

By

None of the imagery of Lemonade is foreign to those of us who grew up in the South or who have Southern roots. ...more

The Conversation: Jayson Smith and A. H. Jerriod Avant

By

My responsibility is to not be negligent and cause unnecessary harm. To a listener or reader. My allegiance is only to truth. ...more