Posts Tagged: Barbara Berman

Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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First, Barbara Berman reviews Stanford academic and author Eavan Boland’s poetry collection, A Woman Without A Country, a rumination on Irish American identity, motherhood, and “literary citizenship.” Boland’s “straightforward brilliance” make this a collection worth reading.

Then, in a funny and insightful Saturday Essay, Sharon Harrigan analyzes the stereotype of the evil stepdad and finds a complicated and much-maligned role in the modern family.

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Barbara Berman’s 2nd Annual Holiday Book Column

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I love it when well known people agree with me, especially when they time it to go with a piece I am working on. Super-agent Andrew Wylie did just that, taking on Amazon in an interview in The New Republic that’s gotten some traction and deserves more.

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Emily Dickinson Reader

The Emily Dickinson Reader by Paul Legault

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At their best, love and translation share some contradictions, including selfishness and generosity. Translation is impossible, or at least not very good, without a passionate desire to own the material and leave one’s mark on it. At the same time, few translators want to “hide the light” of their translations “under a bushel.” The translations they undertake and complete belong to them, are marked by them, and yet they are without much value unless shared.

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Poets Beyond the Barricade

Poets Beyond the Barricade by Dale M Smith

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In Washington, D. C. many years ago, Denise Levertov took questions after a reading and was asked if poets were obligated to protest with poetry when their government was acting illegally or immorally. Levertov replied that of course poets should protest, but since good political poetry was difficult to create, and to judge, writing letters and going into the streets were laudable, often imperative actions.

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My Poets

“My Poets” by Maureen McLane

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Maureen McLane has published two daring, original collections of poetry, and a book called Balladeering, Minstrelsy, and the Making of British Romantic Poetry, from Cambridge University Press. Balladeering, with sometimes sluggish, academic prose, is worth effort for anyone wishing greater understanding of traditions that have influenced romantic poetry and the poetry that has come after it : in other words, anyone who cares about literature.

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What is Amazing

“What Is Amazing” by Heather Christle

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What Is Amazing by Heather Christle is another illustration of my frustration with the word “critic,” why I think “appreciator” is a closer approximation and why I’m still open to one-word suggestions.

Christle was born in 1980 and has two earlier books and a Believer Award to her name, as well as poems in Verse, Columbia Poetry Review, Boston Review, The New Yorker, and publications Rumpus readers may not have heard of and should get to know better.

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