Posts Tagged: baseball

The Single Most Important Thing: Talking Sports and Writing with Sridhar Pappu

By

Sridhar Pappu discusses his first book, The Year of the Pitcher, writing it over six years, and the roots of his baseball fandom.

...more

Your Patriotism Isn’t Love, It’s Blindness

By

Love of country, some argue. With their boots firmly planted in my chest as I struggle to protest. No, that is not love, but blindness.

...more

Dispatches from the Swamp: The Absolute Necessity of Softball

By

And then one guy on his team yells, “You have to touch the bases, buddy! This is still America!” That is all it takes. For one guy on the other side to put country over party.

...more

Next Letter for Kids: Rachele Alpine

By

We’re sending our next Letter for Kids from Rachele Alpine! Rachele writes to us about her love of baseball, books, and especially hockey! And the importance of being yourself because there’s only one YOU! To make sure this letter reaches your favorite young reader, subscribe by June 1! And through May 25, purchase a yearly Letters for Kids subscription and […]

...more

This October Sunday

By

Here we are again, another one-run game, another last chance.

...more

The Healing Magic of Baseball

By

In that favorite summer of my memory, Mom is perched on the edge of the rickety folding chair in box seats that the team manager reserved for us.

...more

David Biespiel’s Poetry Wire: The Suit

By

It was as if he understood that the authentic must begin in the voice. And through the texture of the voice—its moral and psychological claims—sensory details emerge with absolute authority.

...more

David Biespiel’s Poetry Wire: Not That Town

By

Times like those lead you to believe that writing is, before it’s anything else, about simply getting it straight.

...more

If Writers Were Baseball Players

By

With giddiness over the National League Championship, Lit Hub imagines the amusing fantasy lineup of players if the baseball teams were made up entirely of writers. Pitting Jennifer Egan and George Saunders against Malcolm Gladwell and Alice Munro, the list is an entertaining interpretation of writers’ styles translating into athletic skill.

...more

Paper Trumpets #26: Famous Myths of the Golden Age

By

This is part of the mystery and sometimes frustration of doing collage—trying to remember where things came from.

...more

The Rumpus Interview with Brian Shawver

By

Author Brian Shawver talks about his new book, Danger on the Page, his novel Aftermath, MFA programs, and why it’s a good thing that writing never stops being hard work.

...more

Murakami’s Starting Pitch

By

The satisfying crack when the bat met the ball resounded throughout Jingu Stadium. Scattered applause rose around me. In that instant, for no reason and on no grounds whatsoever, the thought suddenly struck me: I think I can write a novel. At Lit Hub, Murakami shares the introduction to Wind/Pinball: Two Novels, due out in August, […]

...more

The Rumpus Late Nite Poetry Show: Daniel Anderson

By

In Episode 5 of The Rumpus Late Nite Poetry Show, Dave Roderick sits down with poet Daniel Anderson to chat about his latest collection, The Night Guard at the Wilberforce Hotel, finding the rhythm in lines of poetry, and baseball.

...more

Roger Angell Nation

By

When you read Roger Angell, you can (it’s cheesy, but true!) smell clover and hear the crack of a baseball against a baseball bat. Angell is synonymous with baseball writing, and this week, he’s being inducted into the Hall of Fame. To celebrate, the New Yorker has a post up, featuring a video interview with Angell and […]

...more

Baseball with Mister Way

By

When summer arrived, the butler for the newcomer the villagers called “Mister Way”—they couldn’t pronounce Hemingway—came into town to fetch the boys. He left the house and followed the long drive to the gate, turned into the village, gathered the boys from their homes and led them back to the Finca, where they found a baseball diamond marked out in the grass.

...more

Jason Novak in the New Yorker, Y’all!

By

Our beloved illustrator Jason Novak collaborated with Mike Duncan for a New Yorker piece about performance enhancement in baseball. You see, if we ban steroids because they’re unnatural, it only makes sense to “cleanse America’s pastime of all artificial enhancements.” Novak’s drawings bring these “artificial enhancements” to life, from open-reduction internal-fixation surgery to Phiten necklaces (“just kidding, […]

...more

Why Baseball Movies Usually Strike Out

By

From Ernest Lawrence Thayer’s “Casey at the Bat” to Chad Harbach’s The Art of Fielding, there’s something about baseball stories that captures our imaginations. Have baseball movies done the same? Maybe, but with much less artistic integrity, argues Kevin Courrier in a Critics at Large post about baseball movies in general and this year’s 42 in particular. A […]

...more

‘The The Angels Angels’ & Other Astrophysicist Baseball Observations

By

Neil deGrasse Tyson (Astrophysicist, American Museum of Natural History. Author: Space Chronicle, The Pluto Files. Host: StarTalk Radio) on Baseball: > Tonight’s @AllStarGame compells me to Tweet what Baseball looks like through the lens of an astrophysicist… > In the 1960s, when we still dreamed, we named a dome, a baseball team, and even the artificial turf they […]

...more

Literary Knuckleballer

By

Baseball’s spring training—really winter training—seems pretty superfluous these days. Most players employ personal training staffs, stay in top shape year-round, and hone their skills relentlessly with the aid of the most advanced technologies available. Yet still they arrive at camp for a month and a half of training and exhibition games each February, all of […]

...more

Poetic Lives Online: Links by Brian Spears

By

The Sycamore Review paid someone for a poem. It cost them a quarter and the poem was written on a bar napkin. Sounds like a worthwhile trade. Kent Johnson on The New British School Publishing an e-version of your book? Prepare to be boarded. I think this is a terrific way to get poetry out […]

...more