Posts Tagged: beauty

An Experience and a Life and a Family: Talking with Scaachi Koul

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Scaachi Koul on her debut essay collection One Day We'll All Be Dead and None of This Will Matter, learning to be patient with her own narrative, and three rules for book tours. ...more

This Week in Short Fiction

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This week, a new Maggie Shipstead story at Virginia Quarterly Review explores love, infidelity, and the ways life can slip from under your feet like an avalanche. Bonus: there is also a literal avalanche. The story, “Backcountry,” follows a twenty-five-year-old ski instructor named Ingrid (#1 baby name for future ski instructors) who meets a fifty-plus-year-old married (he tells Ingrid he’s divorced) man with big dreams of building a ski resort on a nearby mountain.

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Dedicate Your No-Trump Vote: Michelle Hoover

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You see, when a man believes he has the power to grant a woman personhood by admiring her looks or her body’s use to him... he also believes he has the power to take it away. Trump believes he has this power. ...more

Kahlo vs. Kardashian: The Subversive Potential of the Female Self-Portrait

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Where does the line between the self-portrait and the selfie fall? ...more

The Limits of Extreme Beauty: Nicolas Winding Refn and Neon Demon

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Daylight here burns up the atmosphere. The dawn of a new day is, in fact, the end of everything. ...more

Self-Reflection

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At Lit Hub, Kathryn Harrison discusses her relationship with her reflection and the asymmetry in her face as she ages:

Time passes, months, then years, and that bathroom mirror loses its power to frighten me. Still, I find it mysterious, and even wonderful, that there would be so stark and irrefutable—so apt—a symptom of nervous breakdown as a failure to recognize one’s own face.

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Extensions of the Self

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Over at Vela Magazine, Rachel Wilkinson explores the cultural significance of women’s hair:

Feminists have often identified hair grooming as the first lesson in gender socialization. Dolls are perfectly designed to aid girls in learning submission, letting them play-act the labor that will later be expected of them when it comes to appearances.

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Growing Up: The Rumpus Interview with Michelle Tea

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Michelle Tea discusses life in recovery, the meaning of family, motherhood, and her new memoir How to Grow Up. ...more

The Saturday Rumpus Essay: All Bodies Count

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Personal representation weighs heavily on the disabled because we don't often see each other out in the world. ...more

The Unsettling Visions Of Thomas Disch

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“Fantasy is not avoidable. The very act of writing fiction is a sin, a lie. One of Disch’s most haunting stories, ‘Getting Into Death,’ is about a writer (one who uses two pseudonyms, at least one of which Disch used himself) who orchestrates her death by fabricating warmth and sentiment toward everyone she has ever known, creating a surfeit of charmingly mawkish moments.

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