Posts Tagged: Book Riot

Are You the Woman Reader?

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It’s not that the books that get someone into the “serious reader” club are all or even mostly by men these days. But the books that get you kicked out of the club are almost exclusively written by women.

Hannah Engler writes for Book Riot on “women’s literature” and the still-unevolved stereotype of the Woman Reader.

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Death Becomes Her

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I’m going to learn to let my murder flag fly, flap by tiny blood-stained flap.

For some, the fantasy isn’t enough. They have to read about real people dying in horrible ways too. At Book Riot, Rachel Weber discusses her love of true crime, and how pop culture phenomena like Serial and Making A Murderer have made her feel less guilty about her morbid inclinations.

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Necessity of Truth

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Over at Book Riot, Hannah Engler discusses memoir, when the absolute truth is necessary, and why it is okay—even unavoidable—to fabricate facts:

Fabrication is inherent in memoir writing. Number one, it’s impossible to have an unbiased view of your own life, period; number two, it’s impossible to write about something in the past tense and not see it through the lens of the present.

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On The Beauty of Words

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At Book Riot, Aram Mrjoian explores the question of what makes a sentence beautiful. He conjectures that our brain becomes overwhelmed when it sees words organized and used in a way that is beyond its imagination:

Maybe, when words are amalgamated together into some combination that we could never imagine, our brains need a split second to allow the synapses to fire and connect, creating a stronger mental tie to the language that binds us together as humans.

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A Blurb of Beauty

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At Book Riot, Amanda Diehl brings an optimistic anecdote to the often-bleak conversation on the value of book blurbs (typically rife with accusations of corporatism, cronyism, and empty praise). If the form can rise to the artistry of Margaret Atwood’s one-line praise for Laline Paul’s The Bees—“[A] gripping Cinderella/Arthurian tale with lush Keatsian adjectives”—perhaps there’s hope for the blurb yet.

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Margaret Atwood’s Brilliant Book Riot Guest Post

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Did you see that guest-poster over at Book Riot?

She’s some young upstart named Margaret Atwood with some crazy ideas about horror, terror, genre fiction, and literary fiction.

To add to that, the complete Edgar Allan Poe was in the primary school library – those were the days in which only the presence or absence of Sex determined what was suitable for children – so I was no stranger to tell-tale hearts, teeth ripped out of semi-corpses, dead women coming back to life through other dead women, and so forth.

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The 411 on reading and crying while commuting

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Embrace those subway tears, urban commuters!

Busses and trains are great places to read, but how do you cope when you’re on a crowded train making limited stops and the book you’re reading causes those tear ducts to flood? Preeti Chhibber at BookRiot has some anecdotes and solutions of her own on how to play it cool when literature takes you for an emotional ride.

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And In Some Perfumes Is There More Delight

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You know what Ernest Hemingway looked like and what his writing sounded like—but what did he smell like?

Inspired by a perfume on Etsy called “Dead Writers,” Book Riot’s Amanda Nelson imagines scents named after various canonical authors.

Our favorites include Flannery O’Connor (“Church incense, soap, vanilla, ginger”) and Edgar Allen Poe (“Poppies, absinthe, sandalwood, and mold”).

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