Posts Tagged: Brenda Shaughnessy

Fear and Loathing

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For Lambda Literary, Christopher Soto talks with Brenda Shaughnessy about her new collection of poetry and how she relates to her writing as someone who is already four collections in. She outlines the ways in which her work has been shaped by embarrassment, her experiences within the queer community, and the importance of a writer unselfconsciously leaving herself open to new things:

But I found that I could use my embarrassment against itself: a new kind of fuck-you to an inner critic I hadn’t realized I’d been listening to my whole life.

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Ordinary Days of Grandeur

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Don’t miss the weekly staff picks over at the Paris Review. Lorin Stein recommends Brenda Shaughnessy’s soulful and stripped down So Much Synth, Jeffery Gleaves praises “mother writer” Rivka Galchen’s Little Labors, and Caitlin Youngquist writes of Bernadette Mayer’s Works and Days, “Hardly any of Mayer’s days are spectacular, but her eye is so keenly attuned to all that surrounds her that nearly everything feels touched with grandeur.”

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Notable NYC: 5/31–6/6

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Saturday 5/31: Miranda Beverly-Whittemore, Ethan Hauser, and Paul Rome have a conversation with publishing insiders Katie Raissian, Erin Harris, and Brittney Inman Canty. Bittersweet (May 2014), Beverly-Whittmore’s new novel, is about a girl and her roommate at a prestigious East Coast college.

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Notable NYC: 1/18–1/24

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Saturday 1/18: Ed Steck and Anselm Berrigan join the Segue Reading Series. Steck’s first collection, The Garden: Synthetic Environment for Analysis and SImulation (2013), is partly composed from a military intelligence technical text. Berrigan has collaborated with painter Jonathan Allen to produce LOADING and with Anna Moschovakis resulting in Anna’s Half / Anselm’s Half.

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Jazzy Danziger: The Last Poem I Loved, “Epithalament” by Brenda Shaughnessy

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Contrary to popular belief, language is not flat, passionless, clichéd and dying, and if you disagree, it’s imperative that you read Brenda Shaughnessy’s poem “Epithalament” as soon as possible.

Language must be “weirded” if it’s going to make the ordinary new again and rejuvenate the old ideas.

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