Posts Tagged: catapult

This Week in Essays

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In a stunning bit of reportage at Guernica, Lacy M. Johnson looks at the costs of laying nuclear waste to rest, and at the impact doing so has had on one particular St. Louis suburb.

For Nowhere, Hillary Kaylor finds there’s little she can do to help the kids who spend their days scavenging a dump in Cambodia.

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This Week in Essays

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“There may be freedom in America but it is not for me.” At Catapult, Kenechi Uzor reminds us that not every immigrant story is an uncomplicated, happy one.

Mallika Rao writes for the Atlantic on the the beloved web series Brown Girls, its coming leap to HBO, and the promise of more complex narratives for people of color.

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Saying What Shouldn’t Be Said: A Conversation with Julie Buntin

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Julie Buntin discusses her debut novel, Marlena, why writing about teenage girls is the most serious thing in the world, and finding truths in fiction. ...more

This Week in Essays

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Take an immersive trip down the Maine coast with Porter Fox at Nowhere magazine.

For The Rumpus, Nancy Jooyoun Kim examines the bizarre dynamics and privilege within the world of tourism.

At The Offing, Gabrielle Montesanti’s reflections on piss are pretty great.

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This Week in Essays

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When Sandra A. Miller’s sister gets cancer, the family looks to their similar sense of humor as a way to power through in an essay on Literal Latte.

Here at The Rumpus, Leslie Jill Patterson looks at the unprecedented action on death row in Arkansas and the ways we try to reassure ourselves in matters of state-sanctioned murder.

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This Week in Essays

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For Huffington Post’s Highline magazine, Jason Fagone profiles a trauma surgeon working to make a small dent in our country’s problem with gun violence.

At Catapult, Abbey Fenbert writes a funny, heartfelt essay about trying to ban books in the seventh grade.

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The Rumpus Book Club Chat with Julie Buntin

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Julie Buntin discusses her debut novel, Marlena, the writers and books that influenced it, tackling addiction with compassion, and the magic of teenage girls. ...more

This Week in Essays

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For Lidia Yuknavitch, the personal is unavoidably political in this piece for Electric Literature.

At Catapult, David Frey writes with moving realness on what it is like to watch a parent age and transition into assisted living.

Jenessa Abrams looks at the nuances of mental illness and the damage of a word like “crazy” here at The Rumpus.

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This Week in Short Fiction

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At the PEN America awards ceremony on Monday evening, writer Amy Sauber received the PEN/Robert J. Dau Short Story Prize for Emerging Writers for her short story “State Facts for the New Age,” a Rumpus Original Fiction piece published in September 2016.

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This Week in Essays

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For Electric Literature, Christine Vines ably dissects the TV show Crazy Ex-Girlfriend and finds it wanting, with the notable conclusion that “We still have a problem with the word ‘crazy’ and this show, despite its feminist packaging, is doing nothing to alleviate it.”

Rumpus Advisory Board member Melissa Febos offers essential advice to writers on how to handle the demands on your time over at Catapult.

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This Week in Short Fiction

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At Catapult, Arielle Robbins writes a powerful story of coping with the legacy of sexual abuse. “From the Abuse Survivor’s Workbook” delivers the story, as the title suggests, in segments from the guided-journaling workbook sometimes prescribed as part of therapy, offering glimpses into the memories, anxieties, and daily life of the story’s survivor, Brie.

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That’s What She Said

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Have you submitted a piece to “Funny Women” and it wasn’t quite the right fit for the column? Have you always wanted to write for “Funny Women” or Daily Shouts or McSweeney’s Internet Tendency? Our very own Funny Women Editor Elissa Bassist is teaching another two-day workshop at Catapult, so if you missed out in the fall, now is your chance to learn from the best!

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This Week in Essays

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Austin Gilkeson writes at Catapult about holding on to and savoring that which is easily taken for granted as he loses hearing in one ear and waits for the other to go.

For West Magazine, Laine Bruzek describes how living under constant threat potential takes it toll on many women, even when what happens seems small.

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AWP 2017 Offsite: Write Together, Fight Together

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Don’t miss our 2017 AWP offsite event, co-hosted with Barrelhouse, Catapult, and Lit Hub!

Write Together, Fight Together will include readings from: Jericho Brown, Nicole Dennis-Benn, Melissa Febos, Morgan Parker, and Sarah Sweeney, to be followed by music and dancing. Free admission, February 9, 2017, doors at 6:30 p.m., readings begin at 7 p.m.

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This Week in Essays

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At Catapult, Toni Jensen writes a mesmerizing narrative of documenting assault and human trafficking intermixed with her experiences at Standing Rock and facing threats of violence.

At Hazlitt, Aparita Bhandari examines goddess figures and the ways that within current belief systems such figures can be both problematic and reassuring.

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This Week in Short Fiction

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Tomorrow night, we denizens of planet Earth will gather with friends and family, or with complete strangers at a bar somewhere, or with a mob of people in an over-crowded and freezing square, or we will stay home alone, taking a bubble bath and with a bottle of wine (or two), and enjoy our solitude because we’re so over 2016, and we will all say goodbye to a year that has unanimously been ranked by mankind as a touch worse than the year in which that meteorite wiped out the dinosaurs.

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This Week in Essays

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At Lit Hub, Jonathan Reiber, a former speechwriter for the Obama administration, weighs our souls and our words during this political transition.

Chivas Sandage writes for The Rumpus about helping the men in our lives to fully understand the constant state of vigilance women live in.

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This Week in Short Fiction

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Motherhood is an all-consuming thing. The sleepless nights, the endless diapers, the undying love, the absurd tasks that must be performed to ease a baby into nap time. But time and energy aren’t the only casualties of motherhood. In our culture, motherhood often demands one’s identity as well, consumes it whole as the woman becomes a public object for fawning over, for scrutinizing, for judging whether she measures up.

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Electric Literature to Offer Scholarships for Catapult Classes

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Electric Literature, in partnership with the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, is offering full scholarships to workshops and classes that they’ll be co-presenting with Catapult. The scholarships are open to people of all ages and levels of experience, with the only requirement being that writers are New York City-based.

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