Posts Tagged: Catherine Lacey

What to Read When You Don’t Want Summer to End

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A list of books that take place in the summer, remind us of summer, and/or just make for great beach reads. ...more

Notable Los Angeles: 6/26–7/2

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Monday 6/26: Mel Goodman discusses and signs Whistleblower at the CIA: An Insider’s Account of the Politics of Intelligence. 7 p.m. at Vroman’s Bookstore.

ALOUD presents An Evening with Roxane Gay. She will be discussing her new book, Hunger: A Memoir of (My) Body, in conversation with journalist Ann Friedman.

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Notable NYC: 6/17–6/23

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Sunday 6/18: Sherman Alexie presents his memoir You Don’t Have to Say You Love Me. WORD Jersey City, 5 p.m., free.

Monday 6/19: Arundhati Roy presents The Ministry of Utmost Happiness. BAM, 7:30 p.m., $25.

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Notable Chicago: 6/16–6/22

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Friday 6/16: Visit Women & Children First to Celebrate the launch of Sharon Solwitz’s Once, In Lourdes with a conversation between Sharon and local author S. L. Wisenberg. 7:30 p.m., free.

Saturday 6/18: Don’t miss Chicago Pride Fest (not to be confused with the parade next week) in Boystown!

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An Interview Goes Both Ways

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An unorthodox conversation, or experimental, two-way interview between Jesse Ball and Catherine Lacey at BOMB yields miscommunication, communication, repetition, randomness, push, pull, aphorism, and wisdom. On reading contemporary literature, Ball says:

There’s something pernicious about work that is from your specific time because of all the prejudices that are invisible at this moment… I think we’re most blind to the worst things in our own time… But, I mean, of course I read things that come fervently recommended.

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The Rumpus Interview with Lincoln Michel

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Lincoln Michel talks about his debut short story collection, Upright Beasts, his interest in monsters, and what sources of culture outside of literature inspire him. ...more

Notable NYC: 2/14–2/20

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Saturday 2/14: Aziza Barnes, Sasha Fletcher, and Montana Ray are Poets with Attitude. Mellow Pages Library, 7:30 p.m., free.

Bill Berkson and Matt Longobucco read poetry. Dia: Chelsea, 6:30 p.m., free.

Nicola Masciandaro and Ariana Reines join Segue Series.

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The Post-Wounded Woman

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Leslie Jamison‘s The Empathy Exams coins the phrase “Post-Wounded Woman,” referring to women who “are wary of melodrama so they stay numb or clever instead. Post-wounded women make jokes about being wounded or get impatient with women who hurt too much.” Catherine Lacey‘s debut novel Nobody Is Ever Missing embodies this ideal, writes Daphne Merkin at the New Yorker.

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I Am Not My Protagonist

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At Buzzfeed Books, novelist Catherine Lacey writes about an interview she had with a reporter who assumed Lacey had based the protagonist of her first novel on herself. To an extent, Lacey finds this frustrating, but then she considers the way all writers are and are not their characters:

What I should tell anyone who might ask again is that no fiction writer can honestly tell you what parts of her characters are mutations or facsimiles or pure inventions of the self.

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