Posts Tagged: childhood

The Rumpus Interview with Jerald Walker

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Jerald Walker discusses his memoir, The World in Flames: A Black Boyhood in a White Supremacist Doomsday Cult, the story of his childhood in The Worldwide Church of God, and how the act of writing delivered him from bitterness. ...more

The Saturday Rumpus Essay: Nádleehí: One Who Changes

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I am scared. I will continue to be scared. I am scared that, one day, I will not be able to run as fast as my dad who eluded rocks and a tire iron. ...more

Rumpus Original Fiction: Salt

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A flash-fire covered the horizon all around and behind her, and my mother glowed genuine blue. I saw her skeleton, or maybe her white-hot soul. Something flew up and around our heads. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Jessica Valenti

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Jessica Valenti discusses her memoir, Sex Object, how the experiences she touches on in her book shaped her, and how she discovered herself outside of those experiences. ...more

Market Researching My Desire

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I noted the weirdness, and then filed it away until a time I might really consider the implications of wanting to bury someone’s stockings. I was lost in metaphor, which meant I was lost in everything. ...more

The Real Fidel

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In a flash nearly 200,000 Cuban refugees understood that we’d lost our homeland and had better get used to life en la Yuma. We packed for six weeks, and we stayed for six decades. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Vanessa Hua

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Vanessa Hua discusses her debut collection, Deceit and Other Possibilities, writing fiction in order to understand life as an American-born child of immigrants, and the importance of literary community. ...more

The Last Book I Loved: So Long, See You Tomorrow

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By drawing us into his childhood, Maxwell shows us how to revisit our own. We become the storytellers of our own lives. ...more

Sunday Rumpus Fiction: One Small Victory

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Now he started to cry and couldn’t stop the tears. He’d found a way to beat his hunger until the next meal, and he didn’t know when that would be. Hunger, his acts from hunger, made him cry. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Jacqueline Woodson

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Jacqueline Woodson discusses her latest novel Another Brooklyn, the little deaths of lost friendships, and her work with children across the country as the Poetry Foundation's Young People's Poet Laureate. ...more

Fitting Characters and Scripts

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Unwittingly, my mother teaches me in this conversation her generation’s word for gay: 同性恋. I look it up in an online dictionary, three characters in my mother’s tongue. Same, sex, and love. ...more

This October Sunday

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Here we are again, another one-run game, another last chance. ...more

The Sunday Rumpus Interview: Shane McCrae

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I think that the moment we’re living in offers the best opportunity we’ve had in a long time in that a lot of things having to do with identity politics are being talked about in poems. ...more

Readers Report: Harvest

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A collection of short pieces written by Rumpus readers pertaining to the subject of “Harvest.” ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Rich Ferguson

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Rich Ferguson discusses his debut novel New Jersey Me, moving to the Garden State from the South as a kid, and how music has influenced his writing. ...more

What We Lost: Undoing the Fairy Tale Narrative of Adoption

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The singular, unavoidable truth about adoption is that it requires the undoing of one family so that another one can come into being. ...more

The Sunday Rumpus Essay: Tinfoil Astronaut

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Every time I leap there is a chance I will fall, and every time I fall there is a chance I will finally crack my head open like a Faberge egg and luminous black spiders will crawl out to mark the outline of my body with blinking stars and black thread. ...more

Mr. Clarke, the Real Hero of Stranger Things

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He’s the teacher who encourages questions beyond the class assessment, who always gets his students to open the “Curiosity Door.” ...more

Natural Born Drivers

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He only knew that the Blazer, like the green card, was something he wanted my brother and me to have, so that we knew we deserved things, things like America. ...more

A “Girl” and Her Mother

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At The Millions, Naa Baako Ako-Adjei discusses reading Jamaica Kincaid’s “Girl” through the lens of her relationship with her own mother growing up, and her new understanding of the story fifteen years later:

In my rereading of “Girl,” I also realized that I never noticed how transgressive the story is.

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