Posts Tagged: children

This Week in Short Fiction

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Motherhood is an all-consuming thing. The sleepless nights, the endless diapers, the undying love, the absurd tasks that must be performed to ease a baby into nap time. But time and energy aren’t the only casualties of motherhood. In our culture, motherhood often demands one’s identity as well, consumes it whole as the woman becomes a public object for fawning over, for scrutinizing, for judging whether she measures up.

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Readers Report: Harvest

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A collection of short pieces written by Rumpus readers pertaining to the subject of “Harvest.” ...more

Trump Dads: A Confession

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Mine wears short shorts while he jogs, with a baseball cap over his baldness, and no shirt.

His comes home from work and changes into a full gray sweatsuit, then sits at the head of the kitchen table to relax by eating a block of cheddar cheese.

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The Big Idea #13: Dawn Tripp

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Dawn Tripp discusses Georgia, her new novel based on Georgia O’Keeffe’s life, O’Keeffe’s distancing herself from feminism, and balancing biography with fiction. ...more

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The Rumpus Interview with Belle Boggs

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Belle Boggs discusses The Art of Waiting about navigating through the difficulties of conception and fertility treatment. ...more

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Rumpus Original Fiction: How to Become a Tiger

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Tigers are bigger than my comprehension. That’s what I want. I want to be bigger than I am, so big I can’t even imagine it, so real I can’t ever be misinterpreted. ...more

Lois Lowry on Lord of the Flies

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Lois Lowry takes to the New York Times with her story of reading Lord of the Flies for the first time at age sixteen, and how her perspective on its portrayal of children and violence has (and hasn’t) changed in the book’s six decades since publication:

Today’s young readers, inundated as they have been recently by violent apocalyptic books, probably cannot imagine the effect William Golding’s novel had on the innocent and introspective girl that I was then.

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Dedicate Your No-Trump Vote: Robin Black

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In a world in which it is okay for our president to mock a man with disabilities, we might well never see again the ultimately beautiful sight of a classroom of children disowning their own cruelty, choosing to be on the side of decency and care. ...more

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The Storming Bohemian Punks the Muse #8: Dappled Things

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The small town where I have recently landed is ugly and beautiful. Walk down the main street: there are a few old gems like an ancient and glorious Masonic Hall, now home to evangelicals. Several boarded up stores, ugly as can be, and some small town cafes: one for Giants fans, specializing in breakfast, pancakes and pennants all over the joint, one Mexican taqueria, one family pasta palace with red and white checkered table cloths and cheap chianti, and an old-school diner for burgers.

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FUNNY WOMEN #144: Food Reviews by Third Grader

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This refined combination will transport taste buds into a state of euphoria matched only when capturing a rare Mewtwo on Pokémon Go. ...more

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The Rumpus Poetry Book Club Chat with Monica Youn

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The Rumpus Poetry Book Club chats with Monica Youn about her new collection Blackacre, hypothetical tracts of land, Milton, and infertility. ...more

Lessons from The Little Virtues

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For the New Yorker, author Belle Boggs reflects on Italian writer Natalia Ginzburg’s collection of essays, The Little Virtues, and how the book influenced her own parenting philosophy. Boggs writes:

The title essay considers what we should teach children—“not the little virtues but the great ones,” according to Ginzburg.

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The Rumpus Interview with Ben Ehrenreich

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Ben Ehrenreich, author of The Way to the Spring: Life and Death in Palestine, discusses oppression, objectivity in journalism, and millennial politics. ...more

Poetry Inspires Kids to Change the World

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To do spoken word, you need bodies, you need people, you need that sense of gathering.

Poets have always tapped into an unspoken understanding that language can tap into the ways in which the world works. Over at the Huffington Post, Daveed Digs and Danez Smith discuss how poetry equips children with a sense of voice that inspires them to be more engaged with the world around them.

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The Saturday Rumpus Interview: Tara Laskowski

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I realized that I’m interested in how people change when something terrible happens to someone else. ...more

On Visibility and Middle-Aged Women

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Over at Lit Hub, Dorthe Nors discusses writing about middle aged women who, on the verge of becoming invisible to a society that only values women as mothers or as sex objects, refuse to disappear:

The interesting thing is that middle-aged women on the search for essence and their license to live can come off as quite provocative characters.

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This Is Not a Story About a Ghost

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This is a story about memory. About neurons misfiring, about the strange space between dream and awake, that feeling, when I’m falling asleep, of falling backwards, swinging my arms up to catch myself. ...more