Posts Tagged: children

Poetry Inspires Kids to Change the World

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To do spoken word, you need bodies, you need people, you need that sense of gathering.

Poets have always tapped into an unspoken understanding that language can tap into the ways in which the world works. Over at the Huffington Post, Daveed Digs and Danez Smith discuss how poetry equips children with a sense of voice that inspires them to be more engaged with the world around them.

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Tara Laskowski

The Saturday Rumpus Interview: Tara Laskowski

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I realized that I’m interested in how people change when something terrible happens to someone else. ...more

On Visibility and Middle-Aged Women

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Over at Lit Hub, Dorthe Nors discusses writing about middle aged women who, on the verge of becoming invisible to a society that only values women as mothers or as sex objects, refuse to disappear:

The interesting thing is that middle-aged women on the search for essence and their license to live can come off as quite provocative characters.

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This Is Not a Story About a Ghost

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This is a story about memory. About neurons misfiring, about the strange space between dream and awake, that feeling, when I’m falling asleep, of falling backwards, swinging my arms up to catch myself. ...more

Vast Questions About Our Humanity

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Alexis Deacon and Vivian Schawrz’s ” groundbreaking philosophy book for toddlers,” I Am Henry Finch, just won the 2016 Little Rebels Children’s Book Award. The award recognizes children’s books that address social justice and equality for youth:

Their picture book is about a young finch called Henry who branches out from the sameness of his flock in order to discover his own individuality and, ultimately, his own greatness!

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Anne Enright

The Sunday Rumpus Interview: Anne Enright

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Anne Enright, author of, most recently, the novel The Green Road, talks with Elizabeth Isadora Gold about motherhood in reality and in fiction, and writing beyond labels and easy definitions. ...more

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The Rumpus Interview with Robyn Schiff

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Robyn Schiff talks about her collection A Woman of Property, the long con of “owning” land, her passion for early novels, how motherhood changed her poetry, and the generative powers of form. ...more

Meghan Daum (c) David Zaugh Color

The Rumpus Interview with Meghan Daum and Elliott Holt

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Meghan Daum, the anthology's editor, and Elliott Holt, who contributed its penultimate essay, discuss Selfish, Shallow, and Self-Absorbed. ...more

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The Sunday Rumpus Interview: Laurie Jean Cannady

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The author of the new memoir Crave: Sojourn of a Hungry Soul talks about growing up impoverished, abused, and in love with words. ...more

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The Saturday Rumpus Review: 99 Homes

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99 Homes continues Bahrani’s tendency to take on big topics, to cut them into chewable pieces for its audience ...more

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The Saturday Rumpus Essay: Taking Comfort in Futurama

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I’m a comfort watcher... I retreat into the worlds I know well, with characters that are friends, with outcomes I already understand. ...more

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The Rumpus Interview with Amy Fusselman

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Amy Fusselman discusses her latest memoir/manifesto/philosophical treatise Savage Park, the rise of a new kind of nonfiction, and what kind of art “discombobulates her and makes her scream.” ...more

One Way for Women To Be

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What I should have said to that crowd was that our interrogation of Woolf’s reproductive status was a soporific and pointless detour from the magnificent questions her work poses. (I think at some point I said, “Fuck this shit,” which carried the same general message and moved everyone on from the discussion.) After all, many people have children; only one made To the Lighthouse and The Waves, and we were discussing Woolf because of the books, not the babies.

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Matthew Baker

The Rumpus Interview with Matthew Baker

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"Master fictioneer" Matthew Baker talks about his new middle grade novel, If You Find This, artists as tricksters, his favorite comic strips, and why children are still capable of believing in impossible things. ...more