Posts Tagged: Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

What Do I Do With My Fear?: A Conversation with Megan Stielstra

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Megan Stielstra discusses her new essay collection, The Wrong Way to Save Your Life, fear, privilege, and the intersection of politics and everyday life. ...more

Erasing the Girl: Why Don’t We Trust Women to Tell Their Stories of Disordered Eating?

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I didn’t want to criticize her, or demand explanations from her. I just wanted to hear her speak. ...more

What to Read When You Want to Make America Great Again

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Here is a list of books that help remind us what actually makes America great (hint: it's not tax cuts). ...more

This Week in Essays

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For the Guardian, Dina Nayeri explores the troubling expectation that immigrants should replace their identity with gratitude.

At New York magazine, Bahar Gholipour covers the fine points of dredging up personal history when writing memoir.

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“Language Orthodoxy,” the Adichie Wars, and Western Feminism’s Enduring Myopia

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Adichie is far more significant than her accusers seem to know. ...more

The Read Along: Neda Semnani

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I picked up The Odyssey because I wanted to read about wanders and refugees. A story about a man who takes a decade to get home and is on a quest for safety seemed like a good place to start. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Robert Glancy

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Robert Glancy discusses his sophomore novel, Please Do Not Disturb, growing up under a dictatorship, borrowing and stealing from reality, and his love of proverbs. ...more

This Week in Indie Bookstores

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Revolution Books in the Harlem neighborhood of Manhattan is literally advocating for real revolution.

Broadway Books in Portland, Oregon spent Inauguration Day handing out Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s We Should All Be Feminists.

Dallas, Texas is getting an independent bookstore.

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This Week in Essays

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At The California Sunday Magazine, Brooke Jarvis has a devastating piece about missing persons and family members lost over the border.

For VIDA, Jean Ho shares her discouraging experience at the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference.

And here at The Rumpus, Chellis Ying writes about rock climbing in China, which turned out to be an opportunity for both thrills and connection.

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The Rumpus Interview with Anuk Arudpragasam

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Anuk Arudpragasm discusses his debut novel The Story of a Brief Marriage, the bombing of civilians during the war in Sri Lanka, documenting war crimes, and powerful Tamil women. ...more

The Read Along: Laura Goode

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Jesus Christ, this book is like, Toni Morrison/Susan Sontag good. This book is first viewing of Beyoncé's Lemonade good. This book is Simone Biles good. ...more

This Week in Short Fiction

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There’s a new short story by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie in the world this week, and it’s a Mrs. Dalloway-style imagination of a day in the life of Melania Trump as she plans a dinner party. The story, titled “The Arrangements,” is the New York Times Book Review’s first-ever commissioned piece of fiction (to be followed, for the sake of bipartisanship, by a second story from a different author on the Clintons in the fall).

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The Saturday Rumpus Essay: Suffragette and Feminist Inaction

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A significant issue in the suffragette movement was its racist treatment of women of color. ...more

Writing Homosexuality in Africa

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Within the past five years, we’ve seen a sea change in attitudes towards homosexuality by writers, in part a response to virulent anti-homosexual legislation in key locations. Writers such as Chimamanda Adichie and Binyavanga Wainaina have been very open about their personal views on homosexuality and have gone on to challenge and change how homosexuality and same-sex desire is represented in fiction.

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The Saturday Rumpus Essay: Stepfatherhood

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“He was my real dad,” she says. “I just happened to have two.” ...more

Breaking Silence

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For the Guardian, Nicole Lee reports on Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s closing lecture at the PEN World Voices festival, where the Nigerian author expressed concern for the “dangerous silencing” of an American culture that “fears causing offense.” In addition, Adichie encouraged a culture of “listening,” and spoke of the boundaries between writing fiction and contributing to public conversations surrounding contemporary social issues.

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This Week in Short Fiction

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Just when you thought you had a full biblio of Shakespeare’s plays, up pops another. Tom Jacobs wrote earlier this week for Pacific Standard on Double Falsehood, a play found nearly a century after Shakespeare’s death and now believed to be at least partially written by the Bard.

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Kinky Reggae

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Kima Jones chats with Marlon James over at Midnight Breakfast; the two touch on ghost stories, Bob Marley’s reverberations, and the danger in assuming a story’s authenticity:

Some of the things that people think are invented are actually true. It’s also this thing that Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie talks about with “The Danger of a Single Story,” where we think one person is the sum total of one thing.

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Morrison and Díaz on Writing, Editing, and Race

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We’re all very excited about the new Beyoncé album (especially the track featuring Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie), but there’s another must-hear event for literary types: a Live from the New York Public Library conversation between Junot Díaz and Toni Morrison.

Díaz once said in an interview that “the most sustained love of mine, the one that’s carried me through all these years, is my relationship with Toni Morrison,” and as one of the NYPL’s 2013 Library Lions, he got the chance to speak with her at length onstage.

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African Literature in African Languages

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The BBC’s Gavin Esler conducted a brief but thought-provoking interview with Kenyan author Ngugi Wa Thiong’o.

Whereas Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie declares she has “taken ownership of English,” Thiong’o balks at the idea of enriching only English-language literature at the expense of literature in languages like Igbo or Luo: “Can you or anybody else imagine French literature in Zulu?”

The blog Dynamic Africa has some short, interesting posts on the subject here and here.

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Is the Caine Prize Controversy Overblown?

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Last week, we wrote about the imbroglio surrounding Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s dismissive remarks about the prestigious Caine Prize: “I haven’t even read the stories—I’m just not very interested,” she said in an interview. “I don’t go to the Caine Prize to look for the best in African fiction.”

But does Adichie really deserve all that controversy?

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