Posts Tagged: Christianity

A Spirit Born into a Human Body: Talking with Akwaeke Emezi

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Akwaeke Emezi discusses her debut novel, Freshwater, her public and private identities, and deciding when to translate culture for readers. ...more

Rivers of Babylon: The Story of a Third-Trimester Abortion

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She said something to me, then, that has been a great comfort. “You had a choice,” she said, “but you did not have free will.” A choice that was no choice at all. ...more

Less Brilliant but More Profound: Denis Johnson’s The Largesse of the Sea Maiden

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[I]n Johnson’s whole protean oeuvre, more than any pair of books, Jesus’ Son and The Largesse of the Sea Maiden are like binary stars, locked in orbit, distinct but inseparable, each throwing its light upon the other. ...more

Dispatches from the Swamp: The Babble in the Bubble

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To the extent that America—that great big word that makes us all so anxious—exists at all, it exists as a vast and noisy sheet of bubble wrap. ...more

The Story We Have Yet to Tell: Talking with Haroon Moghul

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Haroon Moghul discusses How to Be a Muslim: An American Story, his own religious journey, and the blessings that come with being an outsider. ...more

In a Quicksand of Language: A Conversation with Krys Lee

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Krys Lee discusses her debut novel, How I Became a North Korean, having empathy for people and characters, and finding the balance between real-world facts and imagination. ...more

Voices on Addiction: The Honeybee

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She never stopped, a bee buzzing from flower to flower to flower, collecting all the sweetness she could. ...more

The Saturday Rumpus Essay: The Cost of Intimacy

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Chasing intimacy can feel cheap—and yet intimacy we pay for can be meaningful. I find traditional therapy as awkward as sex, exposing my emotional self like I expose my body. ...more

Allowing a Female to Own Her Genius: Talking with Alana Massey

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Alana Massey discusses her debut collection, All the Lives I Want, the best piece of writing advice she's ever received, and acknowledging the work that women do. ...more
As Cities Burn - Come Now Sleep | Rumpus Music

Albums of Our Lives: As Cities Burn’s Come Now Sleep

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Most often, I do not speak when I am alone. That morning I sat on the couch and said Oh my God. I said it aloud, again and again, Oh my God. ...more

Breaking the Binaries: A Conversation with Lidia Yuknavitch

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Lidia Yuknavitch discusses her new novel, Book of Joan, a reimagining of the Joan of Arc story set in a terrifying future where the heroine has emerged to save a world ravaged by war, violence, and greed. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Jerald Walker

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Jerald Walker discusses his memoir, The World in Flames: A Black Boyhood in a White Supremacist Doomsday Cult, the story of his childhood in The Worldwide Church of God, and how the act of writing delivered him from bitterness. ...more

Rumpus Original Fiction: Salt

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A flash-fire covered the horizon all around and behind her, and my mother glowed genuine blue. I saw her skeleton, or maybe her white-hot soul. Something flew up and around our heads. ...more

Crybaby College Students and Their Bogus Trophies

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I’m a small blue dot living in a blood-red corner of a red state, so I’ve grown accustomed to hearing right wing talking points. I don’t like them, but they surface as regularly in my southwest Florida town as white egrets on the highway and dolphins in the Gulf.

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This Week In Indie Bookstores

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A New Paltz, New York bookstore with an anti-Trump sign is fighting a ban against it.

An Egyptian bookstore has a “scream room” where customers can scream as loudly as they like.

With the Gilmore Girls revival only a month a way, there’s a hypothesis that Jess might own a Stars Hollow Bookstore.

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The Rumpus Interview with J.D. Vance

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J.D. Vance talks about his memoir, Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis, the perils of upward mobility, and never forgetting where you come from. ...more

David Biespiel’s Poetry Wire: 21 Poems That Shaped America (Pt. 4): “Roosters”

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the roosters brace their cruel feet and glare // with stupid eyes / while from their beaks there rise / the uncontrolled, traditional cries. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Yaa Gyasi

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Yaa Gyasi discusses her debut novel Homegoing, growing up in Alabama, the multiplicity of black experiences, the legacy of slavery, and her writing process. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Garrard Conley

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Garrard Conley, author of the new memoir Boy Erased, discusses growing up in the deep South, mothers, writing for change, and political delusions. ...more

(K)ink: Writing While Deviant: Jera Brown

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I wanted to uncover the nest of wires comprising my gender identity and describe its complicated mass. ...more

Mary Wept over Sex Worker’s Rights

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At The BelieverShannon Tien caught up with Chester Brown, graphic novelist and author of the newly released Mary Wept Over the Feet of Jesus, which Tien describes as “essentially a layman’s interpretation of the Bible.” Mary Wept is a collection of graphic adaptations of Biblical scenes involving prostitution, including Brown’s interpretation of Mary as a prostitute, with the goal of shedding light on the truths of sex work and advocating for the rights of sex workers, while presenting his personal vision of the Bible.

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The Conversation: Jeremy Clark and Thiahera Nurse

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I’m thinking about the difference between “I stay somewhere” and “I live somewhere.” ...more

The Rumpus Review of The Revenant

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On its surface, The Revenant is a story about revenge and survival. On a deeper level, it’s about how those two motivations factor into a generational battle between the (God-like) forces of nature and industry—a sort of perverted Armageddon. ...more

Marilynne Robinson on Being an American

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When Christians abandon Christian standards of behavior in the defense of Christianity, when Americans abandon American standards of conduct in the name of America, they inflict harm that would not be in the power of any enemy.

Marilynne Robinson, author of Housekeeping, Gilead, Home, and Lila, writes about how Christianity and exceptionalism have the potential to serve a thoughtful American identity.

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