Posts Tagged: Chronicle of Higher Education

The Man Behind the Ivory Curtain

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At The Chronicle of Higher Education, the writer behind @AcademicsSay (better known as “Shit Academics Say”) reveals himself as Nathan Hall, an associate professor at McGill University. In addition to his reveal, Hall discusses how the popular Twitter account allowed him to connect with a much wider community of academics and create wide-ranging participation studies […]

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Literary Criticism Criticism

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At The Chronicle of Higher Education, Jeffrey J. Williams takes on the question of the role of literary criticism, both historically and in the current moment. In a world where big data is king, criticism has increasingly moved away from radical political pronouncements and metaphysical interventions, and toward what Sharon Marcus and Steven Best have termed […]

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High-Speed World

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The world is moving faster than ever. Digital technologies have allowed, encouraged, and even required quicker processing of information. The net effect isn’t necessarily a good thing—all that speed has left people struggling to consume information in fragments, and is ultimately eroding art. Mark C. Taylor explains over at The Chronicle of Higher Education: All […]

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When Good Grammar Is Actually Bad

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Adverbs acting as manner adjuncts “do not occur between whether and infinitival to,” you guys. Duh. Or, in other words, you can’t say, “…decide whether unconditionally to attend the Geneva talks.” Instead, you should say, “…decide whether to unconditionally attend the Geneva talks,” because that “rule” about split infinitives doesn’t actually exist. Geoffrey Pullum explains […]

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Guthrie Still Elusive at 100

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Leonard Cassuto of the Chronicle of Higher Education discusses the absence of Woody Guthrie in the university because of his political stance, his views on copyright and shying from the spotlight, and the “aw shucks” Oklahoman personality he cultivated. Cassuto outlines Guthrie’s life in reference to his works, which include over 3,000 poems and songs, […]

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Battling E-Pirates

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What happens when a philosophy professor takes on e-piracy? He discovers that it’s not quite as cut and dried as he first thought. Let me be clear–the issue of whether or not his work was pirated is clear. It unquestionably was. The thing that’s not so clear is whether or not it’s harmful to him […]

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The New Math Doesn’t Really Work

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What does one do with an essay like the one David Alpaugh penned for the Chronicle of Higher Education on the current state of poetry publication? As an editor who publishes about 50 poems a year here on The Rumpus (all directly solicited), I feel like I have to respond, since I’m contributing to the […]

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Saturday Morning Links

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Welcome to Saturday, everyone. Hope you find this stuff as entertaining as I did. I’m not quite sure just what to make of this story: women in bathing sits and cartoonists drawing on them. Interesting photos at the very least. This is happening in Florida too: University of California executives are getting raises while faculty […]

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Saturday Morning Links, Independence Day Edition

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Olay, I confess–there’s nothing particularly “Independence Day” about this linkfest. Except for this story about the history of preserving the original Declaration of Independence. But that’s it. Onward! It’s rare that I’ll take the side of a lawyer, but man, this is some bullcrap. Maybe I’m too cynical, but I’ve always assumed this sort of […]

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Brian’s Saturday Morning Links

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Not enough sleep? Echoes of a faint hangover? Then it’s time for Saturday Morning Links. Dahlia Lithwick and Doug Kendall point out that conservative politicians who are upset about empathetic judges probably ought to stick a sock in it. Whether you’re an academic or a free-lance writer, you might want to take a look at […]

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