Posts Tagged: climate change

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The Rumpus Interview with Russell Banks

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Russell Banks discusses his new book, Voyager: Travel Writings, why we are never free from our history, and how writing saved his life. ...more

Liberal Censorship

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In May, Portland’s school board voted to ban textbooks that questioned the severity and human causes of climate change, drawing criticism not only from the right, but from free-speech advocates as well:

“Social studies texts accurately describing the political debate around fossil fuels and climate change, for instance, would presumably contain comments from individuals who ‘express doubt about the severity of the climate crisis’.

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Rumpus Original Fiction: On Documentation

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What is it like to be you? he was always asking, in his way, and it seemed a stupid question then. I didn’t know. I could lie better than I could tell the truth. I hadn’t left yet. ...more

Anohni on Environmental and Body Politics

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Anohni, the new incarnation of Antony Hegarty, spoke with VICE about her album HOPELESSNESS, the politics and environmental crisis its songs address, and controlling the intrusion of an artist’s body into her work. In reference to her decision to subvert the influence of her particular body on the art, Anohni said:

I’ve never been that interested in my physical body as a convincing visual conduit for my voice.

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The Rumpus Poetry Book Club Chat with Tess Taylor

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The Rumpus Poetry Book Club chats with Tess Taylor about her new collection Work & Days, manual labor, and the lyric possibilities in small fields. ...more

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The Rumpus Interview with Debbie Moderow

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Debbie Moderow talks about her new memoir, Fast Into the Night: A Woman, her Dogs, and their Journey North on the Iditarod Trail, the realities of dog sled racing, and climate change. ...more

Fueling the Future of Fiction

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We may have the necessities of life, but that’s never been enough for us as a species. We are forever pushing at the boundaries, never quite convinced that we’ve got what we need to live as we want… But I do want to know what we’ll do when we get what it is we think we want, and what the ripple effects will be, and what we’ll decide to want next.

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The Rumpus Interview with Chris Jennings

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Chris Jennings talks about his new book Paradise Now: The Story of American Utopianism, incremental reform, Transcendentalists, Shakers, and creating a more perfect future. ...more

Antony Hegarty Laments Climate Change

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In the wake of this week’s forum on climate change in Paris, Antony Hegarty has released a song lamenting the destruction already wreaked, and the destruction to come, from our complicity in the mounting environmental disaster. Recorded under the name ANOHNI, “4 Degrees” highlights a predicted change in global temperature by the year 2100.

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Creatives for Climate Change

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We posted earlier about Björk working to prevent a pipeline in Iceland, and she is continuing to lobby this point while working to raise support of climate change activism across the board.

Today, world leaders are meeting in Paris to discuss how to address climate change, and many creative icons have signed a petition speaking for the “creative community” and its desire to spearhead dramatic and inspiring change.

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The Rumpus Interview with Kate Walbert

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Author Kate Walbert talks about her new novel, The Sunken Cathedral, about the way cities change over time, and her approach to using footnotes in fiction. ...more

The Dystopian Present

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For the Guardian, Megan Quibell argues that climate change has changed dystopian fiction, as many recent dystopian works rely on a “catalyst” that stems from “the destruction of the environment.” The result is a series of books that “hammers home” the reality of climate change, which is “not something for the distant future.”

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Save the Birds: A Rumpus Roundup

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Jonathan Franzen is an avid bird lover, as anyone who read Freedom might have guessed.

Two weeks ago, Franzen wrote a piece for the New Yorker that, among other things, condemned the Audubon Society for focusing too much on climate change and not enough on conservation, the society’s original mission.

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Doomsday Clock Keeps Ticking

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The metaphorical doomsday clock moved two minutes closer to midnight last week by scientists concerned about climate change. The 68-year-old concept was developed to gauge how close the world is to destruction, with the end coming at midnight. When the clock debuted, the time was set at 7 minutes to midnight in the wake of the atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

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Seriously, Though

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At Salon, Lydia Millet gets serious about sexism, climate change and extinction, and the literary establishment’s dismissal of funny books:

“Important” serious books often seem to be picked based on the simplicity and safety of their content as a barometer of upper-middle-class cultural preoccupation, and humor’s too complex and ambiguous to be a flagship like that.

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Derrick Jensen’s Essay from The Time After

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In the time after, when industrial civilization is a bitter and too-slowly-fading memory, a memory of a nightmare too atrocious to be believed by those who were not alive in the time before and so did not experience it and its destructiveness, birds will begin to come back, and whip-poor-wills will sing, and bobwhites will sing, and murrelets will fly to oceans no longer being murdered and will return with their bellies full of fish to feed their young.

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Cape Farewell

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Established by artist David Buckland in 2001, Cape Farewell coordinates cultural responses to climate change. One dope thing they do is send groups of artists, musicians, educators, writers, and scientists into the arctic–not forever, just for a trip. Past expeditions have included Feist, Amy Balkin, Vikram Seth, Jarvis Cocker, and Gary Hume, creator of the Hermaphrodite Polar Bear, below.

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