Posts Tagged: confessional

#SuicideGirls: Why I Teach Sylvia Plath

By

But let’s not forget: feminism is, at least in part, about choice, and portions of life are play, not politics. Play and relationships and creativity and whatever we want. ...more

The Sunday Rumpus Interview: Shane McCrae

By

I think that the moment we’re living in offers the best opportunity we’ve had in a long time in that a lot of things having to do with identity politics are being talked about in poems. ...more

The Storming Bohemian Punks the Muse #7: The Art of the Accidental Selfie

By

One recent hot weekday afternoon, I told my partner—the guy who created the “Punk the Muse” logo and draws its cartoons—that I wanted to get out and about. We’d been sitting at home too long. Moon’s Handbook for Northern California revealed an abandoned mine, with a ghost town and an old Western cemetery, a half hour’s drive from our home by the Carquinez Bridge.

...more

Swinging Modern Sounds #72: Urban Pastoral

By

It’s like a landscape that you can’t know until you’ve seen it through four seasons, until you’ve seen it on days gray and bright. ...more

A Comic for Dreamers, the Lost, and the Lonely

By

Sometimes, you get lost. In art, in love, in fantasies-turned-dreams, in your five billion part-time jobs. Sophia Foster-Dimino combines daily minutia with drifting existential questions in her comic, “My Girl.”

Read “My Girl” over at Electric Literature, and feel it right in your secretly lonely guts (in a good, comforting way).

...more

The Rumpus Interview with Alida Nugent

By

Alida Nugent talks about her new book You Don’t Have to Like Me: Essays on Growing Up, Speaking Out, and Finding Feminism, the messiness and realness of sex and sexuality, and putting likeability last. ...more

An “I” for an “I”

By

For a growing number of essayists, memoirists, and other wielders of the unwieldy “I,” confessional has become an unwelcome label—an implicit accusation of excessive self-absorption, of writing not just about oneself but for oneself.

Over at the Atlantic, Leslie Jamison argues that personal writing isn’t always confessional or solipsistic writing.

...more

Shock and Awe

By

There’s a misconception about what is truly shocking – that the shocking is the purely explicit. It seems to me that’s easy, and it’s been done in literature for centuries. What’s problematic, the real way to be shocking, is to have an unstable tone, or to use the wrong tone, the tone that’s not appropriate or that’s deemed inappropriate.

...more