Posts Tagged: creativity

Unlinking Mental Illness and Creativity

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The idea that “mental illness is the heart of creativity” has persisted for decades. But this idea can negatively impact one’s ability to seek help that they truly need. At The Establishment, Sarah Bronson debunks the notion that treating mental illnesses like depression unilaterally has a negative impact on one’s ability to create:

I recognize that not all mental illnesses are alike and that some people actually appreciate how their illness uniquely empowers them.

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Mad Love - Lara Downes | Rumpus Music

A Year in the Life #2: Deadlines,  A Love Story

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Deadlines make me crazy. They cause me anxiety, sleepless nights, and self-hatred, but they also make me work very hard, and to manage to always, somehow, so far, pull it off. ...more

On Being Both an Editor and Writer

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At Lit Hub, editor and author Jill Bialosky examines the ways in which writing and editing work themselves out in her mindShe writes in the early morning, before tackling anything else, and then goes to work critiquing the work of other authors:

What happens when my early morning hours have extinguished and it is time to go to the workplace where I earn a living?

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Word of the Day: Mundificative

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(n.); a cleansing medicine or preparation; (adj.) able to cleanse, especially a wound

“Art begins in a wound, an imperfection—a wound inherent in the nature of life itself—and is an attempt either to live with the wound or to heal it.”

–John Gardner, Grendel

The idea of creative expression as a healing experience has been tossed around in both artistic and non-artistic communities for as long as most of us can remember, if not longer; there have even been scientific studies to support the cleansing quality of artistic output.

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The Rumpus Interview with Bud Smith

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Novelist Bud Smith talks about his new book, F-250, working construction and metalworking, finding writing after his friend’s death, and crashing his car over and over again. ...more

Creativity and Mental Illness

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Though I did not know it then, Adeline was not just a work of fiction, or an act of literary ventriloquism. It was my suicide note. Had I succeeded in taking my life, this would have been clear.

At Lit Hub, Norah Vincent writes about the intensity of creating her Virginia Woolf novel Adeline, the link between creativity and mental illness, and how this led her to attempt taking her own life.

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The Rumpus Interview with Richard Ford

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Pulitzer Prize–winning novelist Richard Ford discusses his new book, Let Me Be Frank With You, how metaphor shapes our world, and why he doesn't like the idea he has a battery to recharge. ...more

Word of the Day: Woofits

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(n.); an unwell feeling, particularly in the head; a moody depression; c. 1918, from Nevil Shute’s The Rose and the Rainbow

The archetype of the mad genius dates back to at least classical times, when Aristotle noted, “Those who have been eminent in philosophy, politics, poetry, and the arts have all had tendencies toward melancholia.”

“Secrets of the Creative Brain,” Nancy C.

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The Science of Creativity

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For the Atlantic, Cody C. Delistrarty ponders whether a person can learn to be creative, or if he or she is simply born with the trait. Framing his essay on Mary Shelley and her writing process for Frankenstein, Delistrarty presents several prevailing theories, among them that an “openness to experience” is often crucial for an artist’s work.

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Racists Are Less Creative

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Comparing cognitive tests like the Duncker Candle Problem against views of racial essentialism reveals that racists lack certain problem solving skills, reports Hazlitt:

Creativity is fundamentally the ability to recombine old ideas, moving beyond preexisting categories in order to create things that are genuinely novel.

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Creativity Uninhibited in the Dark

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“Great artists and original thinkers often seem instinctually drawn to the darker hours,” writes Eric Jaffe in his article “Why Creativity Thrives in the Dark.” A recent study conducted by Anna Steidel and Lioba Werth shows that there’s a reason for this trend: “when the lights switch off, something in the brain switches on.”

The idea is that dark places suggest an uninhibited freedom that loosens our thoughts, and that bright places suggest a compliance that restrains them.

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