Posts Tagged: dance

The Rumpus Mini-Interview Project #93: Barbara Browning

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When I requested an interview from Barbara Browning to talk about her new novel, The Gift, she agreed and asked if I had a favorite song she could cover for me on the ukulele. Browning possesses many gifts—she is an accomplished dancer, novelist, performance artist, theorist, teacher, and self-described amateur musician—and The Gift is a rumination on the relationship between artistic giftedness and gift economies, an idea Browning borrowed from Lewis Hyde’s text by the same name.

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Swinging Modern Sounds #81: On Cultural Preservation

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The Lost Boys had their moment in the media, but these people, these survivors, not boys at all and not lost now either, are still here, living lives, growing and changing and thinking and reflecting. ...more

Unafraid and Proud

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In the wake of the Orlando tragedy, questions have been raised about the ability of the gay dance scene to overcome the fear bred by such senseless, yet targeted, violence. A piece at THUMP by VICE argues the importance of dance culture in affirming the right to congregate, unafraid and proud:

Will fear drive us back to the days of blackout tape over bar windows, speakeasy-like password entries, underground nightclubs?

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This Week in Short Fiction

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Some people write about dystopian futures, or reimagined folktales, or ghosts, or science fiction. Sequoia Nagamatsu, author of the upcoming story collection Where We Go When All We Were Is Gone, does it all. The debut collection, out this month from Black Lawrence Press, weaves Japanese folklore and pop culture into fantastical plots and futuristic settings to create stories that illuminate the human heart in modern times.

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The Rumpus Book Club Chat with Sari Wilson

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The Rumpus Book Club chats with Sari Wilson about her new book Girl Through Glass, the demands of the dance world, and New York City as a character. ...more

The Saturday Rumpus Essay: Thunder, Thighs

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Over one third of the women in my survey had been called “Thunder Thighs” at some point in their life. Many were still haunted by this. None of them interpreted “thunder” to mean “power. ...more