Posts Tagged: David Foster Wallace

Voices on Addiction: Zombie Nation

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Sometimes life is so big and so loud and being a human being in the world is so much I feel overwhelmed and need a cocoon. ...more

An Erasure of Distance: Traveling in Circles with Nathan Englander

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Nathan Englander talks about his new novel, Dinner at the Center of the Earth, the experience of being interviewed, and why he believes books can save lives. ...more

What to Read When Your Workplace Is Full of Drama

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In honor of the World's Worst Boss, we've put together a list of books full of workplace drama for you to read while we wait to see if we can get that orange guy fired. ...more

TORCH: My American Playground

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I left the car by the roadside and ran up the slope, in tears now, reaching the picnic tables and swings and, as bright and vivid as in my dreams, my purple-shaped climbing frame, exactly as I remembered it. ...more

Notable NYC: 4/1–4/7

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Saturday 4/1: Paolo Javier and Jill Magi join the Segue Series. Zinc Bar, 4:30 p.m., $5.

Sunday 4/2: Robin Myers and translator Ezequiel Zaidenwerg discuss Conflations. Berl’s Poetry Shop, 5:30 p.m., free.

Monday 4/3: Fiona Maazel, Alissa Nutting, Robert Lopez, Lance Olsen, and April Ayers Lawson join the Franklin Park Reading Series.

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The Rumpus Interview with Melissa Febos

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Melissa Febos discusses Abandon Me, confessional writing, Billie Holiday, reenacting trauma, cataloguing narratives, and searching for identity. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Jade Sharma

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Jade Sharma discusses her first novel Problems, the complicated feelings that came with debuting to rave reviews, and her writing and editing processes. ...more

This Week in Essays

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At Lit Hub, Jonathan Reiber, a former speechwriter for the Obama administration, weighs our souls and our words during this political transition.

Chivas Sandage writes for The Rumpus about helping the men in our lives to fully understand the constant state of vigilance women live in.

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This Week in Short Fiction

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Sometimes, literary magazines fold. It happens all the time because of funding, or manpower, or editorial differences. Usually, print back issues remain for sale and online content is preserved indefinitely, or at least until someone forgets to renew the domain. But this does not seem to be the case with Black Clock, the respected literary magazine out of CalArts that published the likes of David Foster Wallace, Jonathan Lethem, and Aimee Bender, to name only a few of the prominent talents from its pages.

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Treatment and Healing

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Treatment sometimes looks like hospitalization in an overcrowded psych ward and medication that can dissolve personality.

Over at American Short Fiction, Jenna Kahn writes about the depiction of mental illness in literature—as found particularly in “The Depressed Person” by David Foster Wallace, “Silver Water” by Amy Bloom, and “Monument” by Kevin Barry—as it matches (or doesn’t) with her own experience.

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The Desire for Distraction

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For The Millions, Mike Broida revisits David Foster Wallace’s Infinite Jest, arguing that the work’s claims about addiction and the media presaged the influence of “television culture” on the digital age:

The final “joke” of Infinite Jest is that the book is intended to be almost as endless and mirthful as the addictions it depicts.

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The Last Book I Loved: Abbott Awaits

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Summer works like this. Every day small moments cycle like waves within tides, eroding our opportunities on a geological scale invisible from our point of immersion. ...more

Waiting for Wallace

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Despite its “near-canonical” status in America, David Foster Wallace’s Infinite Jest is taking its sweet time in the translation process. So far, it has only been translated into five other languages. At Lit Hub, Scott Esposito spoke to writers and translators to get a feel for how non-English-speaking readers have received Wallace’s opus.

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Tennis as Art Form

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Understanding tennis as aesthetic phenomenon involves returning to that word Wallace insists on using in his discussion of Federer: beauty.

At Guernica, Greg Chase discusses the new collection of David Foster Wallace’s essays on tennis, String Theory, in which tennis is investigated as an art form in light of Kant’s aesthetic philosophy on words like “beauty” and “genius.”

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Is This Water?

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Graduation season is upon us again, and with it comes the vacant, cliché-ridden literary animal that is the graduation speech. Over at Lit Hub, Emily Harnett revisits David Foster Wallace’s famous Kenyon graduation speech, “This Is Water,” and marvels at the insidiousness of the speech’s logic and message:

Tell your audiences that they’re too smart to want a certain thing and give it to them anyway.

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Tennis, Both Metaphor and Not

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The writer, existing only in reflection, is of all beings most excluded from the highest realms.

Over at the New Yorker, John Jeremiah Sullivan writes about the prominence of tennis in the works of David Foster Wallace—in both Wallace’s fiction and nonfiction, tennis is the writer’s most apparently revisited subject, and for good reason, as Sullivan argues: it’s literary.

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Total Noise and Complete Saturation

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For as long as I can remember I’ve been interested, in a clinical way, in silence. ...more

Really Good Fiction

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Infinite Jest recently turned twenty, a birthday so momentous it merited a new edition of the tome for college students to display on their bedside tables. In light of the renewed discussion about David Foster Wallace’s magnum opus, D.T. Max reminds disciples that he also wrote some other stuff:

Alongside his first collection, “Girl with Curious Hair,” published in 1989, “Brief Interviews” and “Oblivion” cumulatively make the case for Wallace as one of the most interesting short-story writers of our time.

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The Rumpus Interview with Elisa Gabbert

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Author Elisa Gabbert talks about her books, The Self Unstable and The French Exit, diversity, publishing, whiteness, and writing in the Internet Age. ...more

On Writing For Old White Men

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At the LA Times, Claire Vaye Watkins recounts her realization that she has been writing to appeal to the white male literary establishment:

I am trying to write something urgent, trying to be vulnerable and honest, trying to listen, trying to identify and articulate my innermost feelings, trying to make you feel them too, trying a kind of telepathy.

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