Posts Tagged: diversity

VISIBLE: Women Writers of Color: Angie Thomas

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Angie Thomas discusses her debut novel, The Hate U Give, landing an agent on Twitter, and why she trusts teenagers more than the publishing industry. ...more

Interrogating the English Language with Safiya Sinclair

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To be forced to speak in the language of the colonist, the language of the oppressor, while also carrying within us the storm of Jamaican patois, we live under a constant hurricane of our doubleness. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Erik Kennedy

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Poet Erik Kennedy discusses literary community and his formative years as a young writer in New Jersey, and shares two new prose poems. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Melissa Yancy

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Melissa Yancy discusses her debut story collection Dog Years, using her day job for inspiration, and being “an old curmudgeon at heart.” ...more

Multitudes: Policing Black Art

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Editors and producers skin my art and wrap my entire face with it, asking me to write and read in Black face. ...more

Luke Cage: When Representation Isn’t Enough

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This show’s true strength is its diverse portrayal of African-American subjectivity and morality, amongst both the male and female characters. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Roxane Gay

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Roxane Gay discusses her new collection, Difficult Women, the problem with whiteness as the default and the need for diverse representation, and life as a workaholic. ...more

This Week in Indie Bookstores

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thisweekinindiebookstores

Best-selling author James Patterson is handing out bonuses to bookstore employees once again, celebrating the people who make best-selling authors possible.

The Daily Beast has a roundup of some of the best independent bookstores across the country.

As if you needed another reason to move to Canada, Toronto is getting five new bookstores.

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Damned and Damaged Vessels

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I envisioned a new science fiction canon, one in which I was a cyborg, fashioning my body into something new. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Gregory Pardlo

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Poet and Pulitzer Prize winner Gregory Pardlo discusses the reverence for poetry found in other cultures, how he strings a book together, and the future of American poetry in light of our national crisis. ...more

Selma Lagerlöf, an Exception to the Rule

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Since the the first Nobel Prize was awarded, Cassie Gonzales explains in “An Unconventional Nobel Laureate” at the Ploughshares blog, the Laureate winner list has not been a bastion of diversity. However, Selma Lagerlöf was an exception—in her brief, funny essay, Gonzalez explains how a “disabled, Swedish, cross-genre, lady-loving author” bucked the white male (and heterosexual and able-bodied) trend back in 1909.

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All Talk, No Action

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Marlon James, author of A Brief History of Seven Killings, pens an essay for Lit Hub pointing out the meagerness of diversity as a meaningful end goal for creative communities. He critiques the repeated use of diversity panels, as they merely benchmark the fact that we have not even managed bring that small goal to fruition and remain heavily reliant on the efforts and labors of writers of color:

The problem with me coming to the table to talk about diversity is the belief that I have some role to play in us accomplishing it, and I don’t.

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Reading YA Lit as an Act of Resistance

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These and many other stories hope to remind us that the freedom to choose our own reading is a form of resistance against the looming threat of a totalitarian state…

YA literature has situated itself as one of the most influential genres in publishing, with more adults reading YA than ever, and young adults being the most “literate” demographic.

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Podcatcher #5: #GoodMuslimBadMuslim

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Podcatcher talks with Taz Ahmed and Zahra Noorbakhsh of #GoodMuslimBadMuslim about the podcast format, finding humor in absurdity, and diversity within the Muslim identity. ...more

Telling, Not Showing

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As I processed a dominant Euro-American writing pedagogy from the perspective of an aspiring fiction writer and an immigrant critic of color, I couldn’t stop wondering: are we, in 21st-century America, overvaluing a sight-based approach to storytelling? And could this be another case of cultural particularity masquerading itself as universal taste?

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Bringing Diversity to the Comic Book Store World

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Ariell Johnson, owner of Amalgam Comics and Coffeehouse in Philadelphia, is the East Coast’s first black female comic book store owner. For CNN, Ryan Bergeron talks with Johnson about opening up the geek world to young black girls, bringing comic authors of color to the forefront, and creating a welcoming space for comic lovers everywhere.

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Florence Foster Jenkins, Meryl Streep, and White Feminism

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Streep’s career encapsulates the mid-to-late 20th century ideal of American whiteness as aspirational and as attainable. ...more

Anti-Blackness in Sci-Fi Publishing

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Less than two percent of science fiction stories published in 2015 were by black writers. And a recent study found that black speculative fiction writers face “universal” racism—more damning evidence demonstrating the institutionalized racism in book publishing, and the importance of introducing more diversity at every level of the process.

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The Rumpus Review of Seoul Searching

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Seeing is a critical part of normalizing, and though it seems like a rudimentary expectation, it’s important for American audiences to see Korean-Americans simply living their lives. ...more

When Clothes Don’t Make The Man: What Suited Leaves Out

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Jason Benjamin’s HBO documentary Suited, produced by HBO’s Girls co-creators Lena Dunham and Jenni Konner, is an eye-opening journey into the niche subject of dressing for success when you’re a gender nonconforming individual. Brooklyn bespoke tailoring company Bindle & Keep is a no-frills, two-person operation consisting of straight, cisgender male founder Daniel who fell into his calling through his non-binary, apprentice-turned-colleague Rae (née Rachel).

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Lost in Translation

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There is such a stark cognitive dissonance at present—Black writers winning prestigious literary awards and facing watermelon jokes in the same moment, White editors wanting racial diversity while still publishing racist poems.

With an introduction by new Editor-in-Chief Chanda Prescod-Weinstein, former contributing editor Casey Rocheteau dissects and describes what went wrong with “white peoples’ best intentions for diversity at The Offing,” at The Offing.

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