Posts Tagged: Electric Literature

Writing Like Someone You Haven’t Yet Read

By

Of course you don’t have to read an author’s work to have to deal with their influence. Major figures like Faulkner, Pynchon, Bolaño, and David Foster Wallace cast such a wide shadow that they’re a liability for every writer today. You can’t write except by writing against them, trying to get out from under, not least because even if you haven’t read them your potential readers have, so the risk of having failed to negotiate their influence is unavoidable.

...more

In Cahoots

By

Richard Wright and Ralph Ellison. Sherwood Anderson and William and Faulkner. Henry James and Edith Warton. And now, X… and you!

The Association of Writers & Writing Programs just announced the establishment of a mentorship program starting in September. As stated on their community page, they are giving special consideration to applicants of backgrounds “typically underrepresented in the literary world” who are unaffiliated with MFA programs, but encourage everyone set on improving their craft to apply.

...more

This Week in Short Fiction

By

Playing off of Jerry Seinfeld’s video series, “Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee,” The Morning News introduced a new column earlier this month called “Novelists in Restaurants Eating Food.” Roxane Gay offered up the first samplingand this Wednesday, Jami Attenburg contributed the second, “Café de la Esquina.” Should there be doubts as to the genre of the review/not review, the editors left a hashtag-fiction indicator at the bottom for us.

...more

All the Poor Young Literary Women

By

Earlier this year, Emily Gould wrote about the perils of selling her first book, an essay collection, and the importance of getting out of debt before finishing her novel. That novel, Friendship, launches next week. Gould spoke with Melissa Duclos over at Electric Literature about the writing process, her electronic bookstore Emily Books, and of course, money:

The finances are important, too.

...more

When The Writing Gets Tough

By

Over at Electric LiteratureJoseph Rositano contemplates the relationship between writing and mental health. Though he admits that creative writing has been associated with “mental abnormality” for centuries (the number of writers who committed suicide isn’t small), it’s still difficult to explain why this particular discipline—as opposed to painting or science, which also have the “‘tortured genius’ stereotype”—is so frequently associated with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder.

...more

This Week in Short Fiction

By

The Los Angeles Review of Books enlisted Kayla Williams, a veteran sergeant and Arabic linguist, to compile a list of war narratives by women for Memorial Day. Williams, herself an accomplished writer of two memoirs on her war experience and return home, offered a wealth of resources for those wanting to know more about American soldiers who served in Iraq and Afghanistan.

...more

“A Bitter Cup of Tea” Worth Drinking

By

Electric Literature has a new review up for Rumpus columnist Jerry Stahl‘s latest book, Happy Mutant Baby Pills:

Jerry Stahl’s Happy Mutant Baby Pills is a hurricane of comedic and satirical horrors involving drug abuse, violence, manic lovers (including their manic sex lives), and ungodly revenge against the United States. Stahl ventures unapologetically through the darkest imaginable places.

...more

Peter Orner at Recommended Reading

By

She’d been ready to do her part for the war effort. Out of appreciation and gratitude and patriotism. All those hours on that terrible ship. Now what Seymour wanted was love, and she couldn’t possibly give that to him.

For Electric Literature’s Recommended Reading series, Ann Beattie highlights “At the Fairmont,” a short short by Rumpus columnist Peter Orner about a woman meeting her husband as he returns from navy service in World War II.

...more

Notable New York, This Week 5/3 – 5/9

By

This week in New York Electric Literature celebrates the launch of Issue 4, the Shepard Fairey exhibit is at Deitch Projects, Daniel Clowes discusses Wilson, John Leguizamo is honored by Spike Lee and Eric Bogosian, Ugly Duckling Presse presents “Talk Show,” and Lynne Tillman and Michael Cunningham pay tribute to Flannery O’Connor.

...more

The Rumpus Sunday Book Blog Roundup

By

“Do not chew on the headphone cords!” — From @electriclit, passive aggressive library signs.

Marc Jacobs is pissing off literary West Villagers by opening a book store.

At The Guardian, Christine Granados has some fightin’ words for Cormac McCarthy and lists other authors she feels write the American southwest better.

...more