Posts Tagged: Electric Literature

Electric Literature to Offer Scholarships for Catapult Classes

By

Electric Literature, in partnership with the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, is offering full scholarships to workshops and classes that they’ll be co-presenting with Catapult. The scholarships are open to people of all ages and levels of experience, with the only requirement being that writers are New York City-based.

...more

Looking for Trump in Classic Literature

By

With the election putting us all on edge, and the news cycles on both political ends spouting the rhetoric of potentially unprecedented catastrophe depending on the results, let’s step back and look to literature for an answer. For example: the many aspects of Donald Trump’s personality as embodied by several characters in classic lit, from Pola Lim over at Electric Literature.

...more

The Card Game Everyone Will Be Playing This Holiday Season

By

Electric Literature just launched a fundraising campaign for their new literary card game full of crude humor and punny jokes about favorite classic authors and works. According to its Kickstarter page, Papercuts: A Party Game for the Rude and Well-Read is “what Kurt Vonnegut, James Baldwin, and Virginia Woolf would play if they were alive, locked in a room together, and forced to play a card game.” If the funding goal is met, we’ll be playing Papercuts by this Christmas!

...more

Gina Frangello’s Kind of Wanting

By

At Electric Literature, Heather Scott Partington interviews former Rumpus Sunday Editor (and forever friend) Gina Frangello about her latest novel, Every Kind of Wanting. They discuss other writers who have influenced her work, the emotional truths that literary fiction can get at, and the duality of her characters:

Characters have to breathe and bleed.

...more

Writing = Work = Job

By

Settling the debate about whether “writer” is job that arose with Merritt Tierce’s Marie Claire essay about going broke post-debut novel, and a response piece by Ester Bloom at The Billfold calling writing a hobby, Lincoln Michel finds a middle ground between the two stances, arguing at Electric Literature that yes, writing should be considered a job—and the attitude that it isn’t encourages exploitation.

...more

“Debate/Discuss/Rend Garments”

By

Over at Electric Literature, Ryan Chapman interviews Teddy Wayne, whose third novel, Loner, seems to effortlessly blow by the clichés of the campus novel: as Ryan calls it, “the writer’s equivalent of the pop ballad.” Wayne begins by citing “non-campus” novels as influences—The Talented Mr.

...more

The Power of Unreality

By

While fiction embraces the flights of fancy that come with imagination, nonfiction is fairly hostile to writers who stray too far away from the objective facts of the story. How closely should writers of nonfiction stick to facts? At Electric Literature, Justin Lawrence Daugherty makes the case for embracing some unreality in writing nonfiction:

We can talk about truth versus fact.

...more

Reading Emotions

By

There’s nothing that the book world likes to debate more than the differences between literary fiction and commercial or genre fiction.  

According to a new study published in Psychology of Aesthetics, Creativity and the Arts, readers of literary fiction are better able to understand emotions as compared with readers of popular genre fiction, Electric Literature reports.

...more

A Perfect Likeness

By

As part of the Hemingway Days festival on Key West each year, the Hemingway Look-Alike Society hosts the Hemingway Look-Alike contest. This year, and for the first time ever, someone with the last name Hemingway took home the honor and the giant medal that goes with it:

Dave Hemingway of Macon, North Carolina and who is of no relation to the author, finally lifted the triumphant bust of “Papa” Hemingway after seven previous appearances in the contest.

...more

In Conversation with Ramona Ausubel

By

Desire is the center of everything. We want because we are lonely, regretful, hopeful. We want because we don’t feel at home in our bodies or our lives. Want is this pivot point between whatever happened before that we’re trying to move away from or closer to and the question of whether we’ll get there.

...more

Extremely Sentimental and Incredibly Useful

By

At Electric Literature, Manuel Betancourt argues that there is value to the “cheap sentimentality” in Jonathan Safran Foer’s Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close and its film adaptation:

What cheap sentimentality can do is to short-circuit our connection to the depths of our emotions, precisely by making us feel that they are closer to the surface than we’re perhaps comfortable with.

...more