Posts Tagged: Electric Literature

Noir Literature as Protest Literature

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With its trope of the hard-boiled, male detective, noir literature has historically had an inclusion problem. At Electric Literature, Nicholas Seeley discusses its burgeoning revival as protest literature against injustice:

Today it has a second chance—assuming it continues to draw in and cultivate new and challenging voices.

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The Literary Value of Hip-Hop

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At Electric Literature, Mensah Demary argues that there should be greater appreciation of hip-hop as a powerful storytelling medium, positing Nas as a master of literary narrative:

If presented with a choice, I’d rather discuss classic hip-hop albums than short story collections: the former evokes warmth, my need to consecrate my life to a certain fidelity and pure aural bliss channeled into nighttime sessions in the bedroom, lights off, completely enveloped by sound, while the latter invokes the image of a bottomless pit.

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Tech Companies Profit While Writers Starve

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Digital media companies are suddenly worried about declining ad revenue, and the venture capitalists funding these companies have also turned off the faucet of cash as they realize that success stories like BuzzFeed and Mashable are not the unicorns everyone thought they were.

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Short Revolution

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Great novels also experiment and innovate, but a short story can make a never-before-seen formal leap and then peace out, before you’re even sure what’s happened.

At Electric Literature, Rebecca Schiff introduces us to the authors who have revolutionized the short story in recent years.

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Let’s Have an Existential Crisis… In Space

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For Electric Literature, Anya Groner discusses the role of space tourism in modern science fiction, and explores how the focus of space exploration narratives have shifted from the technological aspects of interplanetary life to the anxieties and psychological challenges faced by space travelers:

Practical questions give way to unsettling existentialism and thrilling narrative possibilities. 

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The 200 Club

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Electric Literature’s Recommended Reading has put out its 200th issue, and to celebrate, they’re watching television. Or, thinking about watching television by revisiting the 200th episodes of classic sitcoms: J. Robert Lennon on The Cosby ShowRob McCleary on The Love BoatMorgan Parker on The Jeffersons, and Téa Obreht on Frasier.

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Books vs. Extremism

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At Electric Literature, Je Banach explores how literary discourse can “break down barriers” in a time of political extremism:

Literary discourse, the active process of carefully considering the words and ideas of others and then speaking thoughtfully and critically about them—let us not confuse the words “critical” and “negative” here—provides a model of thoughtful, considerate, and intelligent action and dialogue that the world needs.

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The Prose and Poetry of Idra Novey

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I find the more furtively I move between genres, the more I surprise myself as a writer. Moving between genres, you carry curious things over and also carry them away. I like the gray areas between genres—prose that reads like poetry that moves like a thriller that falls over a reader like poetry—to keep mixing it up, and hopefully in the process move the genre of fiction forward in some compelling new way.

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This Week in Short Fiction

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When you think of romance, you probably think Romeo and Juliet, Pride and Prejudice, Gone With the Wind, Wuthering Heights—or anything by Nicholas Sparks if you’re into more modern fare. These famous love stories, spread across centuries, have one thing in common: they’re all about heterosexual couples.

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