Posts Tagged: family

An Experience and a Life and a Family: Talking with Scaachi Koul

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Scaachi Koul on her debut essay collection One Day We'll All Be Dead and None of This Will Matter, learning to be patient with her own narrative, and three rules for book tours. ...more

What to Read When You Need to Understand Corrupt Families

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As we wait for the latest Trump crisis-slash-scandal to shake out, here is a list of great books about terrible families. ...more

Conversations with Writers Braver Than Me: Jessica Berger Gross

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Jessica Berger Gross discusses her new memoir, Estranged: Leaving Family and Finding Home, walking away from her parents age of twenty-eight, and the importance of boundaries. ...more

Rumpus Original Fiction: Grace

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After the anger came a deep, resigned sadness, as if her cruise were canceled at the last minute. She’s stuck on the shore of her life, watching everyone she loves sail into the distance. ...more

TORCH: My Father’s Mansion

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I love the United States, too. Like a house I was raised in, though, I know it up close and can spot its many fissures. ...more

The Saturday Rumpus Essay: The Diggins

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I was told that I was “a good digger” if I was behaving as a young child, working hard, and not talking back. Like nursery rhymes, the rhythm of racism cannot be forgotten. ...more

The Storming Bohemian Punks the Muse #31: Pulling the Trigger on Father’s Day

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June is an ambivalent month for me.

As a child it meant the start of summer vacation, and weeks spent at my grandparent’s beautiful beach home in Hyannisport. This was wonderful because it meant spending time with my siblings and seven cousins, a houseful of children of all ages, and loving—even adoring—grandparents, aunts, and uncles.

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On Grief and Inheritance: A Conversation with Brionne Janae

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The poet Brionne Janae discusses her debut poetry collection After Jubilee, intergenerational trauma, and writing her way into historical personae. ...more

VISIBLE: Women Writers of Color: Tamiko Nimura

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Tamiko Nimura talks about the influence of history, memory, and silence on her work; creating a private MFA for herself; and writing a generational memoir. ...more

A Language in Constant Rebellion: Talking with Aura Xilonen

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Aura Xilonen discusses her novel, Gringo Champion, the realities of immigration, translating texts, and her love of cinema. ...more

Family Is the Deepest Scar: Minae Mizumura’s Inheritance from Mother

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With each word, I found myself thinking of my own grandmother’s journey, escaping war to America with no money, no education, and six children, the pain of this experience inevitably hardening the whole family. ...more

Rumpus Original Fiction: Straw House

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“It’s not healthy, how you live. People aren’t meant to sleep all day. We need the sun. We’re meant to live in the sun.” ...more

On Making Wishes

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It is true that I’m talking to a photo, but I’m not crazy. Neither am I a durochka. Fools are oblivious, at least those from my childhood fairy tales. I, on the other hand, am perfectly aware of the problem. ...more

The Rumpus Mini-Interview #80: Jon Raymond

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Jon Raymond is one of Portland’s finest wordsmiths. His writing spans TV, film, short story, novel, art criticism, and a hefty array of magazine work. His new novel, Freebird, is the story of a Californian Jewish family entangled in clashing politics, unspoken histories, and personal dissolve.

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This Week in Essays

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For the Guardian, Dina Nayeri explores the troubling expectation that immigrants should replace their identity with gratitude.

At New York magazine, Bahar Gholipour covers the fine points of dredging up personal history when writing memoir.

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Mothers of My Diaspora

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It paralyzes me to think about the sacrifices my family made before I was in my mother’s womb. When they came here they knew they would lose a part of their language, their memories, their sanctity of self. ...more

The Saturday Rumpus Essay: The Savage Mind, Pt. 2

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There isn’t even a discussion. There aren’t any words. You just start swinging—the building is a fence, your cousins are a fence. The two of you are surrounded. There’s no escape for either of you. ...more

The Storming Bohemian Punks the Muse #24: Must I Be an Angry April Fool?

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When I attended professional acting school back in 1986 (the MFA program at UC Irvine, I proudly remark), I had a teacher ask me once, “Charles, are you able to feel any authentic emotion other than anger?” I paused for a bit and considered the question, before answering, truthfully, “No.

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Personal, Political, and Poetic: A Conversation with Susan Briante

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Susan Briante discusses The Market Wonders, her newest collection of poetry in which she draws on market indicators like the Dow Jones Industrial Average to construct a criticism of contemporary culture. ...more

TORCH: Lessons From My Grandma on Language and Silence

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The sounds I made were pleasant to my ears, but that’s all they were to me. I was too young to understand what culture and heritage meant, too young to understand the reasons behind memorizing ancient poems. ...more

The Saturday Rumpus Essay: The Savage Mind, Pt. 1

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The violence came in and we were not just in danger of being victims of it. We were in danger of being violent ourselves. ...more

The Rumpus Mini-Interview Project #76: Chris Tusa

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Set in post-Katrina New Orleans, Chris Tusa’s second novel, In the City of Falling Stars (Livingston Press, September 2016), tells a tale of paranoia and intrigue. Maurice Delahoussaye witnesses dead birds falling from the sky, and becomes convinced the air is toxic.

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The Rumpus Interview with Joe Okonkwo

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Joe Okonkwo discusses his debut novel Jazz Moon, the quest for self-discovery, creative inspiration, and what it means to build a family when home is so very far away. ...more

Rumpus Original Fiction: Summer of Families

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“What do you think about this,” he said, measured and cool. “What if we offer a service where people can pay to be in our family, but only for a few hours.” ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Viet Thanh Nguyen

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Viet Than Nguyen discusses his story collection The Refugees, growing up in a Vietnamese community in San Jose in the 1980s, and the power of secondhand memories. ...more