Posts Tagged: fantasy

Between Autonomy and Powerlessness: Her Body and Other Parties by Carmen Maria Machado

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Women’s bodies signify so much, both to ourselves and others, that inhabiting them and having ownership over them often feel like two different states of being. ...more

The Future of Body Horror: Can Our Art Keep up with Our Suffering?

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The individuality of body horror is its signature attribute. Nothing is more intimate than one’s own body, and by extension, one’s own physical suffering. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Jane Alison

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Jane Alison discusses her autobiographical novel, Nine Island, the value of truth in fiction, and unsubscribing from romantic love. ...more

VISIBLE: Women Writers of Color: Jaquira Díaz

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Jaquira Díaz discusses the challenge of writing about family members, her greatest joy as a writer, and her literary role models. ...more

Anti-Blackness in Sci-Fi Publishing

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Less than two percent of science fiction stories published in 2015 were by black writers. And a recent study found that black speculative fiction writers face “universal” racism—more damning evidence demonstrating the institutionalized racism in book publishing, and the importance of introducing more diversity at every level of the process.

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(K)ink: Writing While Deviant: Amber Dawn

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What do we as writers tell each other about the intersections of trauma and desire? How do we encourage (or discourage) each other to reveal the power and tensions in those margins? ...more

Making the Fantasy a Reality

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It’s particularly pleasurable to read interview between writers who know each other well. Over at Oxford American, long-time friends Ada Limón and Manuel Gonzales discuss Gonzales’s new novel, The Regional Office Is Under Attack, and what it means to write with an ear to the fantastical:

When I first started writing, though, I was deep into my college career as an English major and when I went to graduate school I aped mid-century realism—Carver, Yates, O’Connor, the like—trying to write austere, terse stories of disillusionment and vague regret, but these bored me.

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The Limits of Extreme Beauty: Nicolas Winding Refn and Neon Demon

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Daylight here burns up the atmosphere. The dawn of a new day is, in fact, the end of everything. ...more

The Diary of Anaïs Nin While Binge-Watching Broad City

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One episode after another with every outrageous twist and turn. I smile but no laughter comes—just a gaping mouth wishing to devour more! ...more

Save the Children

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Graeme Whiting, headmaster of the Acorn School (motto: “Have courage for the truth”) of Nailsworth, Great Britain, recently published a blog post condemning “sensational” fantasy novels such as the Harry Potter, Lord of the Rings, and Hunger Games series that feature “dark,” “insensitive,” and “addictive” subjects.

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Death Becomes Her

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I’m going to learn to let my murder flag fly, flap by tiny blood-stained flap.

For some, the fantasy isn’t enough. They have to read about real people dying in horrible ways too. At Book Riot, Rachel Weber discusses her love of true crime, and how pop culture phenomena like Serial and Making A Murderer have made her feel less guilty about her morbid inclinations.

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The Rumpus Interview with Minsoo Kang

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Writer and historian Minsoo Kang talks about his new translation of The Story of Hong Gildong, a touchstone novel of Korea written in the 19th century. ...more

The Slow Fall of the Hot Heroine

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If nothing else, it’s the opinion of other women that encroaches on mine. Resemblances spark my joy; differences become character flaws. ...more

Origins of the “Fantasy North”

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E.R. Truitt writes for Aeon on the long history of the “Fantasy North,” the lands, people, and culture at the top of the world that have fascinated pop culture for centuries. Truitt also marks the points in history when the rugged, independent peoples of the Fantasy North became the chosen image of white supremacy movements in North America and Europe.

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Latest Salvo in Genre War

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David Mitchell, author of Cloud Atlas and The Bone Clocks, has been nominated for both “literary” and “genre” awards, putting him in a somewhat unique position to comment on the ever-raging literary vs. genre war:

“It’s convenient to have a science fiction and fantasy section, it’s convenient to have a mainstream literary fiction section, but these should only be guides, they shouldn’t be demarcated territories where one type of reader belongs and another type of reader does not,” said [author David] Mitchell.

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The Rumpus Interview with Lincoln Michel

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Lincoln Michel talks about his debut short story collection, Upright Beasts, his interest in monsters, and what sources of culture outside of literature inspire him. ...more