Posts Tagged: fathers and daughters

Death, Memory, and Other Superpowers

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There was no cedar chest filled with tissue-wrapped rattles, handprint art projects, and bronzed baby shoes. Our parents never spoke of our missing sister. ...more

Voices on Addiction: The Honeybee

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She never stopped, a bee buzzing from flower to flower to flower, collecting all the sweetness she could. ...more

Conversations with Writers Braver Than Me: Jessica Berger Gross

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Jessica Berger Gross discusses her new memoir, Estranged: Leaving Family and Finding Home, walking away from her parents age of twenty-eight, and the importance of boundaries. ...more

Rumpus Original Fiction: Grace

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After the anger came a deep, resigned sadness, as if her cruise were canceled at the last minute. She’s stuck on the shore of her life, watching everyone she loves sail into the distance. ...more

TORCH: My Father’s Mansion

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I love the United States, too. Like a house I was raised in, though, I know it up close and can spot its many fissures. ...more

The Saturday Rumpus Essay: The Cost of Intimacy

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Chasing intimacy can feel cheap—and yet intimacy we pay for can be meaningful. I find traditional therapy as awkward as sex, exposing my emotional self like I expose my body. ...more

On Making Wishes

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It is true that I’m talking to a photo, but I’m not crazy. Neither am I a durochka. Fools are oblivious, at least those from my childhood fairy tales. I, on the other hand, am perfectly aware of the problem. ...more

Breaking the Binaries: A Conversation with Lidia Yuknavitch

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Lidia Yuknavitch discusses her new novel, Book of Joan, a reimagining of the Joan of Arc story set in a terrifying future where the heroine has emerged to save a world ravaged by war, violence, and greed. ...more

The Sunday Rumpus Essay: My Souls Are Out A-Wandering

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What is marriage but another form of colonization? A renaming? A power taken, a power taken away? ...more

The Day the FBI Tapped Our Phones

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I held an image in my mind of my daughter and me in a small rowboat and I’m rowing, rowing, rowing as hard as I can, away from this sinking ship. ...more

Interrogating the English Language with Safiya Sinclair

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To be forced to speak in the language of the colonist, the language of the oppressor, while also carrying within us the storm of Jamaican patois, we live under a constant hurricane of our doubleness. ...more

The Rumpus Interview With Danielle Trussoni

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Danielle Trussoni discusses her new memoir, The Fortress, black magic, the cult of marriage, and the dark side of storytelling. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Melissa Febos

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Melissa Febos discusses Abandon Me, confessional writing, Billie Holiday, reenacting trauma, cataloguing narratives, and searching for identity. ...more

The Sunday Rumpus Essay: Daddy Issues

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What I’m saying is I was a fucking wreck and it’s not my dad’s fault. ...more

Conversations with Writers Braver Than Me: Jason Diamond

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Jason Diamond discusses his memoir Searching for John Hughes, confronting his childhood abuse, avoiding his parents, and writing about all of it. ...more

Rumpus Original Fiction: Salt

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A flash-fire covered the horizon all around and behind her, and my mother glowed genuine blue. I saw her skeleton, or maybe her white-hot soul. Something flew up and around our heads. ...more

Market Researching My Desire

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I noted the weirdness, and then filed it away until a time I might really consider the implications of wanting to bury someone’s stockings. I was lost in metaphor, which meant I was lost in everything. ...more

This Week in Short Fiction

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short-fiction

In a political climate in which undocumented immigrants are painted as criminals and rapists and half the country is crying for deportation, this week’s story reminds us that immigrants are fathers who love their daughters, who work hard and send money home to dying mothers, who will go to the ends of the Earth for their loved ones—they are normal Americans with normal hearts, just like the rest of us.

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The Rumpus Interview with Jacqueline Woodson

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Jacqueline Woodson discusses her latest novel Another Brooklyn, the little deaths of lost friendships, and her work with children across the country as the Poetry Foundation's Young People's Poet Laureate. ...more

Trump Dads: A Confession

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Mine wears short shorts while he jogs, with a baseball cap over his baldness, and no shirt.

His comes home from work and changes into a full gray sweatsuit, then sits at the head of the kitchen table to relax by eating a block of cheddar cheese.

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