Posts Tagged: fathers and daughters

Breaking the Binaries: A Conversation with Lidia Yuknavitch

By

Lidia Yuknavitch discusses her new novel, Book of Joan, a reimagining of the Joan of Arc story set in a terrifying future where the heroine has emerged to save a world ravaged by war, violence, and greed. ...more

The Sunday Rumpus Essay: My Souls Are Out A-Wandering

By

What is marriage but another form of colonization? A renaming? A power taken, a power taken away? ...more

The Day the FBI Tapped Our Phones

By

I held an image in my mind of my daughter and me in a small rowboat and I’m rowing, rowing, rowing as hard as I can, away from this sinking ship. ...more

Interrogating the English Language with Safiya Sinclair

By

To be forced to speak in the language of the colonist, the language of the oppressor, while also carrying within us the storm of Jamaican patois, we live under a constant hurricane of our doubleness. ...more

The Rumpus Interview With Danielle Trussoni

By

Danielle Trussoni discusses her new memoir, The Fortress, black magic, the cult of marriage, and the dark side of storytelling. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Melissa Febos

By

Melissa Febos discusses Abandon Me, confessional writing, Billie Holiday, reenacting trauma, cataloguing narratives, and searching for identity. ...more

The Sunday Rumpus Essay: Daddy Issues

By

What I’m saying is I was a fucking wreck and it’s not my dad’s fault. ...more

Conversations with Writers Braver Than Me: Jason Diamond

By

Jason Diamond discusses his memoir Searching for John Hughes, confronting his childhood abuse, avoiding his parents, and writing about all of it. ...more

Rumpus Original Fiction: Salt

By

A flash-fire covered the horizon all around and behind her, and my mother glowed genuine blue. I saw her skeleton, or maybe her white-hot soul. Something flew up and around our heads. ...more

Market Researching My Desire

By

I noted the weirdness, and then filed it away until a time I might really consider the implications of wanting to bury someone’s stockings. I was lost in metaphor, which meant I was lost in everything. ...more

This Week in Short Fiction

By

short-fiction

In a political climate in which undocumented immigrants are painted as criminals and rapists and half the country is crying for deportation, this week’s story reminds us that immigrants are fathers who love their daughters, who work hard and send money home to dying mothers, who will go to the ends of the Earth for their loved ones—they are normal Americans with normal hearts, just like the rest of us.

...more

The Rumpus Interview with Jacqueline Woodson

By

Jacqueline Woodson discusses her latest novel Another Brooklyn, the little deaths of lost friendships, and her work with children across the country as the Poetry Foundation's Young People's Poet Laureate. ...more

Trump Dads: A Confession

By

Mine wears short shorts while he jogs, with a baseball cap over his baldness, and no shirt.

His comes home from work and changes into a full gray sweatsuit, then sits at the head of the kitchen table to relax by eating a block of cheddar cheese.

...more

The Sunday Rumpus Essay: Tinfoil Astronaut

By

Every time I leap there is a chance I will fall, and every time I fall there is a chance I will finally crack my head open like a Faberge egg and luminous black spiders will crawl out to mark the outline of my body with blinking stars and black thread. ...more

Natural Born Drivers

By

He only knew that the Blazer, like the green card, was something he wanted my brother and me to have, so that we knew we deserved things, things like America. ...more

Rumpus Original Fiction: How to Become a Tiger

By

Tigers are bigger than my comprehension. That’s what I want. I want to be bigger than I am, so big I can’t even imagine it, so real I can’t ever be misinterpreted. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Jonathon Keats

By

Experimental philosopher Jonathon Keats discusses Buckminster Fuller, three-wheeled cars, domed cities, climate change, and cameras with a 100-year exposure time. ...more

Wanted/Needed/Loved: Thao Nguyen’s Release

By

The thing I want to talk about is something I’m not in possession of anymore, but of all the things I’ve lost it’s the thing I think about the most. ...more

Rumpus Original Fiction: Mandarin Imperial

By

Growing up, I understood my father through observation, and I suspect that he understood me much the same way. I liked to think our love was purer that way. Like two stray dogs who found each other and are blessed enough to just get along. ...more

This Week in Short Fiction

By

It’s July, and the summer issues of literary magazines are rolling off both the physical and cyber presses, including Virginia Quarterly Review, which this week shared a story from its summer print issue online. In “Dixon” by Bret Anthony Johnston, author of the bestselling novel Remember Me Like This and the award-winning collection Corpus Christi, a father risks border patrol agents and losing his job to illegally sell a shipment of Dairy Queen kid’s meal toys in an effort to save his daughter.

...more