Posts Tagged: female characters

As Long as What Is Said Is Understood: Talking with Lesley Nneka Arimah

By

Lesley Nneka Arimah discusses her debut collection What It Means When a Man Falls from the Sky, mother-daughter relationships, and the pleasures of genre fiction. ...more

The Rumpus Book Club Chat with Achy Obejas

By

Achy Obejas discusses her new collection, The Tower of the Antilles, what she's learned from translating works of others, and why we should all read poetry every day. ...more

A Language in Constant Rebellion: Talking with Aura Xilonen

By

Aura Xilonen discusses her novel, Gringo Champion, the realities of immigration, translating texts, and her love of cinema. ...more

Lone Star Cinema

By

In clinging to a set of memories that fade more every day, maybe I’m also clinging to an idyllic version of my own past. ...more

What to Read When You Need More Anne Shirley in Your Life

By

Today, the new series Anne with an E premieres on Netflix. Here's a list of books for times when you need a strong female protagonist like Anne Shirley. ...more

Luke Cage: When Representation Isn’t Enough

By

This show’s true strength is its diverse portrayal of African-American subjectivity and morality, amongst both the male and female characters. ...more

Fiction’s Rise of Female Friendships

By

Readers are shifting focus from outdated gender expectations and conceptions of identity, and as a result, complex, non-compartmentalized female friendships are blooming in fiction. Books about these friendships are spaces for female writers and readers to explore the complexity of their relationships and selves without the influence of men, whose presence can quickly turn a female character into a label (mother, daughter, lover, keeper) and distract from the potentially subversive nature of female-only friendships.

...more

Winning the Game of Thrones Like a Girl

By

The days of testosterone-fueled warmongering are long past. Instead, at the end of Season 6, the queens reign, stronger than ever. ...more

Unlikable and Unapologetic

By

Supposedly “unlikable” female characters are often the most complex, humanly flawed, and interesting ones—yet many readers are perturbed by such representations of women. In an excerpt from her collection The Geek Feminist Revolution, Kameron Hurley muses on the reasons why female protagonists are uniquely expected to be likable:

When you find yourself reading about a gun-slinging, whisky-drinking, Mad Max apocalypse hero who you’d love if it was a guy but find profoundly uncomfortable to read about when you learn it’s a woman, take a step back and ask why that is.

...more

This Week in Short Fiction: Goodnight, Beautiful Women by Anna Noyes

By

[Noyes's] stories are nuanced and unapologetic, revealing the shadow sides of women and girls in all their wild and terrible glory. ...more

The Sunday Rumpus Interview: Louise Erdrich

By

The esteemed author talks about the themes of justice, atonement, and reparation in her fifteenth novel, LaRose, and about the importance of Planned Parenthood to her success. ...more

The Case for Including More Female Scientists in Literature

By

If female characters are restricted to the roles of artist, dancer, waitress, or barista, their potential to generate fiction that explores existentially rich and original worlds also seems restricted.

In the ongoing discussion of groups in sore need of better representation in today’s storytelling, Eileen Pollack urges writers to consider writing about female scientists in fiction.

...more

Crime Girls

By

NPR explores whether and how putting “girl” in the title of your crime novel will garner favorable comparisons to heavy-hitters like Gillian Flynn’s Gone Girl and Paula Hawkins’s The Girl on the Trainand therefore benefit from an increase in sales:

So in a way, the girl insignia is trying to tie it into this larger marketing purpose, but sometimes it can be a disservice.

...more

Why Some Voices Are “Stronger” than Others in YA Lit

By

At the School Library Journal, Kelly Jensen examines gender norms and double standards in YA fiction, questioning which female protagonists we refer to as “strong”—and why do not refer to male voices as such:

When women take risks in their writing, when they choose to write female-driven narratives with take-no-bull girls who may not care at all whether you like them or not, they’re not seen as brave.

...more

On the “Novelty” of Strong Women

By

For the Guardian, Hannah Ellis-Peterson discusses the success of Jessie Burton’s The Miniaturist. Since its debut this summer, the author’s first novel has received acclaim for its strong female characters. However, Burton has since expressed frustration over the perception of “strong women” in fiction as a “novelty”:

I’ve always struggled with this notion of a ‘strong female’, because all the females I know in my life are strong, and it’s a term that suggests that by default they would be weak and they are extra-special as a result.

...more

Carrie and the “Strong Female Character”

By

“The “strong female character” who comes closest to equaling Carrie’s volume of carnage is arguably the Bride. But before she turns the House of Blue Leaves into a crimson slip-and-slide, she is battered in flashback after flashback…Before she gets to knife her enemies in the heart or claim their severed limbs, she must lose her husband-to-be and her unborn baby.”

Rumpus contributor Laura Bogart breaks down the correlation to what is perceived as “the strong female character” and on screen violence.

...more