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Posts Tagged: feminism

Working Girls of Laura Jean Libbey

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Katja Jylkka, writing over at The Toast, looks at the working girl novels of Laura Jean Libbey—19th century love stories featuring “innocent,” “bewitching” heroines. Though these pretty young women were able to attract “the wolfish attention of every male in [their] vicinity” just like modern-day manic pixie dream girls, Libbey’s working girls differentiate themselves by exerting agency:

…the original Mary Sues tended to show young women and ethnic minorities in positions of leadership and power, where before they were relegated to minor roles.

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Gender, literature, and criticism

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Women’s work has always been awesome, just as the work written by people of color, minorities, and other classes of people who aren’t white men has been. The work of white men has been awesome, too, but it has benefitted from a system where their work has been assumed awesome, rather than graciously granted the chance to be awesome.

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Lil Wayne: Ecofeminist

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Back in college, Chelsey Clammer proclaimed herself an ecofeminist with an outbreak of bumper stickers on the back of her car: “Tree Hugging Dirt Worshiper,” “‘The Only Bush I Trust is My Own (and underneath that I wrote ‘and my girlfriend’s’),” and “a slew of…rainbow Ani Difranco stickers.”

These days, she’s more partial to Lil Wayne than the Lilith Fair, but she hasn’t given up her ecofeminist ideals, as she explains in an academically rigorous essay for the Nervous Breakdown:

“My anaconda don’t want none unless you’ve got buns, hun.” Mix-A-Lot views (a part of) himself as a snake—perhaps as being one with nature.

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How Toxic Is Online Feminism?

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There’s a heated conversation about online feminism happening—where else?—online right now.

Ignited by a piece in the Nation about Internet toxicity as well as an ill-advised xoJane piece about white privilege in yoga class, the discussion is focusing on intersectionality in feminism, particularly as it regards race.

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The Lowdown on Queer Feminist Comics

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“Sexuality is more than gay and straight, and probably even more than LGBTQIA. Comics are here to help.” So read the delightful subhed for Greg Baldino’s LARB review of two anthologies of comics about gender and sexuality.

The books are The Big Feminist But and Anything That Loves, and though he’s frustrated by certain limitations, he also finds much to praise, including a comic by our very own MariNaomi.

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Feminist Victories You Haven’t Heard About

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In a nation as solipsistic as the US, we don’t hear much about politics in other countries. This is doubly true when it comes to woman-centered movements, and triply true when those movements are in Africa.

In an opinion piece for the Guardian, Minna Salami talks about feminist success stories the Western world has largely ignored:

What would have once sounded like a far-fetched feminist fantasy – namely women forming the majority of a parliament – is a reality in one country in the world: Rwanda.

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Rest in Peace, Patriarchy

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Yesterday, Slate announced the death of the patriarchy at the age of several thousand years.

The Cut’s Kat Stoeffel has honored the dearly departed, which will be mourned by civilizations across the globe, by compiling a list of “39 Things We’ll Miss About Patriarchy, Which Is Dead.”

Some of the blessings we will now tragically be forced to live without: “Not having mandatory paid maternity leave,” “revenge porn,” and “that thing where dudes get an extra half of a seat on the subway for their balls.” Rest in peace.

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NYRB Joins LRB in Hole, Helps Keep Digging

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As we’ve documented pretty extensively before, arts organization VIDA has done a lot to expose gender inequality in the writing world with its annual count comparing female bylines to male ones in a number of publications.

The New York Review of Books‘ ratio has been less than stellar for the past three years, with female reviewers and female authors reviewed never rising above 20% of the total.

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Vela Magazine Lists the Unlisted

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As part of its ongoing battle to get women writers the recognition they deserve, Vela has put together a ”list of women writers of various forms of creative nonfiction that future list-makers and anthologists…might peruse and thereby make their “bests” and “greats” better and greater, their collections more representative of the world we live in.”

Here’s “The Unlisted List” in all its glory!

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The Feminist Reading List to End All Feminist Reading Lists

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In case you missed it, Rumpus contributor Michelle Dean whipped up superb ”pop-culture feminist syllabus” at Flavorwire.

Ranging from time-tested classics like Margaret Atwood’s The Edible Woman to newer but equally exciting material like Issa Rae’s The Misadventures of Awkward Black Girl, Dean’s list includes books, films, TV shows, and songs (plus one “biomythography”) from women of all different backgrounds.

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A Non-Inclusive Feminism

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Last week, we linked to Meghan Murphy’s essay detailing why she believes that marriage is an anti-feminist choice.

But Ona Anosike has a different view.

I feel as marginalized in the dominant patriarchal society as I am in the feminist movement… Yes, marriage can be accused of engaging in patriarchy, but it can also be a radical political statement.

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Three Ways of Looking at Sex and the City

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In this week’s New Yorker, TV critic Emily Nussbaum grapples with the cultural legacy of Sex and the City:

High-feminine instead of fetishistically masculine, glittery rather than gritty, and daring in its conception of character, “Sex and the City” was a brilliant and, in certain ways, radical show.

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“bell hooks’ Feminism Is My Feminism”

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In the latest installment of an Autostraddle feature described as “a biweekly devotional to whoever the fuck I’m into,” Carmen Rios throws a little love party for bell hooks.

Inspired by an eerily prescient hooks quote about “the white male home owner who made a mistake,” Rios ends her celebration of hooks’ legacy as a writer and activist with nine more “quotes that haven’t stopped ringing true.”

Read it!

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Down with Women’s Stories, Up with Stories about Women

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I am not tired of stories about women’s lives, stories that tell me something real about how a particular woman thinks or works or loves. But I am tired of “women’s stories,” stories that are supposed to be about a problem that afflicts “women.”

Anna North has a terrific essay up at Salon about the endless conveyor belt of “women’s stories” expressing uneasiness with women who have casual sex or prioritize careers over marriage.

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