Posts Tagged: feminism

Reading Mslle feature

Reading Mademoiselle Gantrel

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We squinted into the smoky room and saw ourselves on junior year abroad, frolicking on the Left Bank with artists in berets like hers. ...more

Dasgupta feature

Goddesses

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I closed my laptop. I thought of words such as “contexts” and “perspectives.” The next morning, I checked out an armload of books from the university library. I had to learn to defend Durga. ...more

Rediscovering Amber Reeves

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For Full Stop, Emma Schneider reviews a recently republished book: Amber Reeves’s 1914 novel A Lady and Her Husband, which Schneider aligns with “American pre-war feminist classics such as The Awakening and The Yellow Wallpaper.” Reeves’s novel offers a comparatively more practical look at the emergence of pre-feminist concerns at the turn of the 20th century.

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The Rumpus Review of Mustang: Five French Girls Walk into an Anatolian Village

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The Recipe to Decolonized Love is in Beyoncé’s Lemonade

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“There is a curse that will be broken,” she promises. ...more

Let the Men Have Their Book Clubs

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Taking a different stance on the men-only book clubs that have everyone rolling their eyes, Slate’s L.V. Anderson argues that feminists should applaud men embracing an activity that has been so coded as feminine—and eagerly await the day when men do not feel like they have to declare their masculinity in order to do so:

Men who deliberately take time to discuss literature with other men are subverting and challenging gender norms, no matter how jokily macho their book club names might be.

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12 Lol-Worthy Gifs That Will Recuperate Feminist Praxis

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Bitch is where many of today’s feminist internet denizens (yours truly included) got our start reading and writing about culture with a critical eye. In many ways, Zeisler’s book is a call to arms, asking us to return to a rigorous, systemic analysis.

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Leduc Revisited

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To write is to be liberate oneself. Untrue. To write is to change nothing.

Writing for the Guardian, Rafia Zakaria tells us about Violette Leduc: discovered by Simone de Beauvoir and published by Albert Camus, Leduc, the sexually explicit lesbian feminist, was largely unread even in her prime though has always been critically hailed, and her situation today is not much different.

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Or Smash the Mold Straight Off

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If this sounds like a Women’s Lib rap, baby, it is.

For The New Republic, Michelle Dean writes a lovely and winding essay on the life and feminism of Adrienne Rich: its origins in breaking meter, discovery through therapy, her correspondence with Hayden Carruth, the suicide of her husband, and culminating in her National Book Award for Diving into the Wreck.

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Visible: Women Writers of Color #1: Desiree Cooper

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Desiree Cooper discusses her debut collection of flash fiction, Know the Mother, what mother-writers need, and why motherhood is the only story she’s ever told. ...more

hot heroine feature

The Slow Fall of the Hot Heroine

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If nothing else, it’s the opinion of other women that encroaches on mine. Resemblances spark my joy; differences become character flaws. ...more

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The Rumpus Interview with Robyn Schiff

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Robyn Schiff talks about her collection A Woman of Property, the long con of “owning” land, her passion for early novels, how motherhood changed her poetry, and the generative powers of form. ...more

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The Rumpus Interview with Jessa Crispin

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Jessa Crispin talks about The Dead Ladies Project and The Creative Tarot, founding Bookslut, why she has an antagonistic relationship with the publishing industry, and her estrangement from modern feminism. ...more

Mary Somerville: Journalist, Scientist

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Matthew Wills revisits the life and career of Mary Somerville, a 19th century scientist, translator, and a popular science journalist. Somerville also has a notable place in linguistic history: the word scientist was first used in a review of her book, On the Connexion of the Physical Sciences, in 1834.

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The Sunday Rumpus Interview: A Roundtable on Writing, Editing, and Race

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With Lisa Factora-Borchers, Patrice Gopo, Jennifer Niesslein, Tamiko Nimura, and Deesha Philyaw. ...more

The New Women’s Revolution

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Last December, a group of feminist activists from all over the world met and discussed a new women’s solidarity movement. The full discussion, with an introduction by Eve Ensler, is up now at Guernica.

Now is the time for women to write a different story, grown from the everyday struggles and experiences of those who are most often at the receiving end of disastrous policies and ventures, who clean up the messes and transform the destruction, who build the secret shelters, rescue the raped, stand for the dead, hold town halls for the voiceless, and give presence to the invisible.

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The Sunday Rumpus Essay: How To Make Sure Your Writing Is Forgotten

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Do you really want to have to listen from the grave as students discuss your themes and scholars analyze your syntax and trace your influence? ...more

Reading Mixtape feature

Anna March’s Reading Mixtape #20: Greats

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Great strides, great artists, great desires, great complexity—this week’s books are all about these kinds of greats. They also all showcase exceptional writing and take us far and wide—from elective politics to abstract art, from Coney Island to California—to explore great ideas.

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Freeman, John photo credit Deborah Treisman

The Big Idea #12: John Freeman

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John Freeman, Executive Editor at Lit Hub, talks with Suzanne Koven about his new print-only literary magazine Freeman's, the difference between between criticism and editing, and his fear of flying. ...more