Posts Tagged: film

Impersonation and Self-Portraiture

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On July 14, SF MoMA will be opening a retrospective of the work of photographer Cindy Sherman.

Starting with her series Untitled Film Stills, Sherman’s photographs have consistently challenged the limits, meaning, and power of self-portraiture. In an article for the New York Review of Books, critic Sanford Schwartz characterized Sherman as “an impersonator—which in her case means being a creator of people, and sometimes people-like creatures.”

Alongside the retrospective, Sherman has curated a film series, which continues with The Beaver Trilogy on July 12, at 7:00pm.

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Cinema’s Occupy Zeitgeist

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Rumpus columnist Nicholas Rombes explores the “Occupy zeitgeist” in 2011 cinema over at Filmmaker. Rombes reveals how films such as Drive, Meek’s Cutoff, Martha Marcy May Marlene, and Tree of Life, while seemingly “far removed” from the movement, “speak to Occupy anxieties of this past year.”

“…It’s possible that films like Tree of Life somehow capture — in their very structure — the decentralized fantasy of the movement.

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Following The Rules

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“The problem with pulling this kind of thing the wrong way in a speculative-fiction story is that science fiction, fantasy, and horror don’t necessarily share mainstream fiction’s baseline expectations for how reality works, and it’s far too easy to leave audiences feeling cheated, annoyed, or just plain confused when the rules change abruptly, or were ill-defined in the first place.”

This A.V.

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“Russian Doll” Cinema

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“But every so often a filmmaker sneaks a piece of mini-perfection into their movie that’s so self-contained, such an unnecessary tangent, it can stand alone as its own perfect short.”

Nerve archives “five great short films” that can be found inside full-length ones. The article breaks down how each short film fits (or doesn’t) within the larger works of Mulholland Drive, The Social Network, Magnolia, A Serious Man, and The Rules of Attraction.

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Animating Howl

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In yesterday’s San Francisco Chronicle, I chat with artist Eric Drooker about animating Allen Ginsberg’s Howl for the film of the same name as the long poem, and his resulting new book, Howl: A Graphic Novel.

One thing that was edited out of my piece was this sentence: “Howl: A Graphic Novel reads like a panoramic urban altar, demanding something deeper than just the reader’s attention.” Maybe readers are afraid of sacrifice?

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