Posts Tagged: Flannery O’Connor

Change Is Necessary: A Conversation with Kristen Arnett

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Kristen Arnett discusses her debut collection, Felt in the Jaw, how place informs writing, and deciding to hold her book release party at a local 7-Eleven.

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The Delusion of Objectivity: Talking with Leslie Jamison

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Leslie Jamison discusses The Recovering: Intoxication and Its Aftermath, understanding that every text is incomplete, and whether motherhood has changed her writing.

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The House of Fiction Has Many Rooms: Talking with Sigrid Nunez

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Sigrid Nunez discusses her seventh novel, The Friend, her fondness for writing about animals, and the ways the literary world has changed.

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It’s Only a Matter of Time: A Conversation with Jack Driscoll

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Jack Driscoll discusses The Goat Fish and the Lover’s Knot, “the impermanence of everything,” and how he chooses his characters’ names.

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Making a Narrative in the Darkness: A Conversation with Samantha Hunt

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Samantha Hunt discusses her new collection, The Dark Dark, why she became a writer, and the freeing quiet of darkness.

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Worlds Full of Demons: Chavisa Woods’s Things to Do When You’re Goth in the Country

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We must ask ourselves: who stands in the shadows of our national persona, both historically and in the nation’s literature? Woods raises the question, and her work points toward an answer.

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The Rumpus Mini-Interview Project #79: Kelcey Parker Ervick

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The woman whose face appears on the Czech five-hundred koruna doesn’t appear there without consequence. During the late 19th century, politically active Božena Němcová was an innovator of Czech literature. Twenty-first century writer Kelcey Parker Ervick continues Němcová’s legacy in her own fairy tale-like work: a biographical collage, The Bitter Life of Božena Němcová. Comprised […]

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A Way to Make Sense of the World with Suzanne Buffam

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Poet Suzanne Buffam discusses her latest work, A Pillow Book, sleep remedies that don’t work, and the worries that occupy her mind and keep her from sleep.

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The Rumpus Interview with Bonnie Jo Campbell

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Bonnie Jo Campbell discusses her collection Mothers, Tell Your Daughters, the natural world as a character, and finding writing from the male point of view easier.

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The Rumpus Interview with George Saunders

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George Saunders discusses his new (and first) novel Lincoln in the Bardo, Donald Trump, and a comprehensive theory of literature.

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The Sunday Rumpus Interview: Jaimee Wriston Colbert

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Life’s inequities can be cruel, but in the end we are all part of our communities; suffering though we may be, we are not alone.

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The Rumpus Interview with D. Foy

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D. Foy discusses his latest novel, Patricide, the evolution of “gutter opera,” his writing process, free will, and memes.

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The Rumpus Mini-Interview Project #55: Donald Ray Pollock

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Donald Ray Pollock has been steadily serving up plates of mild horror since his first book of short stories, Knockemstiff, appeared in 2008. Pollock followed the explosion of Knockemstiff with The Devil All the Time, in 2011, his first novel, which also bordered on the genre of mystery, again with generous servings of darkness. His […]

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The Rumpus Interview with Lee Clay Johnson

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Lee Clay Johnson discusses his novel Nitro Mountain, growing up with bluegrass musician parents, and what people are capable of under the right set of circumstances.

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The Rumpus Interview with Brian Booker

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Brian Booker discusses his debut collection Are You Here For What I’m Here For?, giving characters strange and unusual names, and sleeping sickness.

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Pulling the Strings of Coincidence

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Coincidence often gives fiction its chance to mean something. Over at Lit Hub, in an excerpt from her new book The Kite and the String, Alice Mattison walks us through brilliantly executed coincidences in E.M. Forster’s Howard’s End, Flannery O’Connor’s story “A Good Man Is Hard To Find,” and Andre Dubus’s story “The Winter Father.” She […]

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Anna March’s Reading Mixtape #25: In a Daze, ‘Cause I Found God

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I’m an atheist who often carries crystal rosary beads and a relic of Saint Elizabeth Ann Seton. My grandparents, Mary and Gus, bought them both at the Vatican where they had traveled to see Pope Paul VI canonize Mother Seton. The rosary beads were a gift to me some months later when I made my […]

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The Sunday Rumpus Interview: Louise Erdrich

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The esteemed author talks about the themes of justice, atonement, and reparation in her fifteenth novel, LaRose, and about the importance of Planned Parenthood to her success.

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Paul Lisicky on Flannery O’Connor

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Writing for the Atlantic, Paul Lisicky recalls two Flannery O’Connor short stories that taught him to love her work. Although critics often highlight O’Connor’s harshness toward her characters, Lisicky says these stories transcend the stereotyped image of her “little punishment machines:” The aim of these stories is certainly satirical, but that’s only part of the […]

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Displaced in the Grotesque

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O’Connor is so often remembered as a misanthropic homebody—but she was comforted by the idea of a God that gave preferential treatment to the most vulnerable among us. For the Paris Review, Dave Griffith writes about reading Flannery O’Connor’s “The Displaced Person,” a story of immigrants in O’Connor’s classic grotesque South, during the global refugee crisis.

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Adventures Are Overrated

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For The Millions, Bill Morris wonders what value adventures and life experiences have on writing good fiction. While at first Morris is convinced that adventure is necessary to write quality work, Flannery O’Connor’s Mystery and Manners convinces him that travel and exploring the world are not entirely necessary: My big mistakes, I now realize, were to equate adventure […]

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The Rumpus Interview with Lincoln Michel

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Lincoln Michel talks about his debut short story collection, Upright Beasts, his interest in monsters, and what sources of culture outside of literature inspire him.

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Plot and Prejudice

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At Electric Literature, Matthew Salesses discusses the works of Joseph Conrad and Flannery O’Connor to explore the problem of unconscious prejudice and unintentional racism in writing, and how writers can avoid it: The writing of fiction cannot treat marginalized characters as vessels, cannot let the plot play out the racism of under-enlightened protagonists. Perhaps the […]

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The Saturday Rumpus Essay: Growing Up Gaming

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“Is this inclusive or exclusive?” he asked with a creased brow. “I don’t like the idea that we’re being treated as a joke.”

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