Posts Tagged: Flannery O’Connor

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The Saturday Rumpus Essay: Growing Up Gaming

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“Is this inclusive or exclusive?” he asked with a creased brow. “I don’t like the idea that we’re being treated as a joke.” ...more

The Gods of Southern Gothic

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At the Guardian, author M.O. Walsh tries to account for the global popularity of southern gothic literature. While he attributes much of southern gothic literature’s success to a tradition of oral storytelling, he also suggests that it is the southern novelist’s ability to treat the “grotesque” with empathy that helps to create memorable characters:

Show me a southern gothic novel written by someone who’s not from the south and the odds are that I’ll show you a bad novel.

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The Rumpus Interview with Christy Crutchfield

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Novelist Christy Crutchfield talks about her debut, How to Catch a Coyote, world building, inspiration, icky fiction, the role of mystery, and the marathon of novel writing ...more

Writing Under the Influence of Catholicism

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William Giraldi talks about writing in spite of Catholicism:

The Catholic O’Connor, in other words, has no Catholic agenda when she sits at the campfire to tell her story—across her singular canon all is chaos in search of grace, all is enigma unveiled but unsolved, and no credo is a clear victor.

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The Rumpus Interview with Paul Griner

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Paul Griner talks about his newest novel, Second Life, his just-released story collection Hurry Please I Want to Know, putting real life into fiction, and whether creative writing can be taught. ...more

The Power of the Common Tongue

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For The Millions, Lauren Alwan provides “a brief history” and analysis of colloquial titles, including works from authors like Ernest Hemingway, Flannery O’Connor, Lorrie Moore, and Raymond Carver. In addition, Alwan offers her insights as to what makes colloquial titles so appealing:

There is a certain power in hearing phrases we know and may have used ourselves.

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The Rumpus Interview with Jamie Kornegay

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Novelist Jamie Kornegay talks about his debut, Soil, life in Mississippi, writing humor effectively, and the geography of isolation. ...more

This Week in Short Fiction

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The gamer story. Regardless of its iteration—D&D, Commodore 64, Nintendo, X Box, LARP—there is the hero, and there is the rest of the gang, subjugated as sidekicks and underlings. The gamer story has a long tradition of tropes and structures, arcs and character elements, at the center of which has always been the hero telling the story and in world more like ours, the person role-playing that hero.

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The Rumpus Interview with Thomas H. McNeely

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Thomas H. McNeely discusses coming of age in the 1970s, Houston's complicated racial history, and his new novel Ghost Horse. ...more

O’Connor Memorialized

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Peacocks, poetry, and one of America’s most enduring authors.

Upon entering the cathedral for the small induction ceremony, attendees were greeted by two gigantic, sparkling sculptures suspended from the ceiling—they are phoenixes, part of an installation by the Chinese artist Xu Bing, but at first glance you might mistake them for peacocks, like the ones that O’Connor raised on her family’s Georgia farm, Andalusia.

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This Week in Short Fiction

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On Tuesday, Aqueous Books released From Here, Jen Michalski’s second short story collection and fourth book. The founding editor of the literary quarterly jmww and a long-time Baltimore resident, Michalski’s fiction has found homes in more than 80 publications.

Looking at the early reviews and the stories from the new collection that have appeared online, one gets a sense of Michalski’s territory: neighborhoods with worn and tattered fences, where yards and lives overlap and spill onto one another, where rules are broken and categories are hard to define.

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And In Some Perfumes Is There More Delight

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You know what Ernest Hemingway looked like and what his writing sounded like—but what did he smell like?

Inspired by a perfume on Etsy called “Dead Writers,” Book Riot’s Amanda Nelson imagines scents named after various canonical authors.

Our favorites include Flannery O’Connor (“Church incense, soap, vanilla, ginger”) and Edgar Allen Poe (“Poppies, absinthe, sandalwood, and mold”).

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A Good Autodidact Is Hard to Find

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For the Atlantic‘s “By Heart,” “a series in which authors share and discuss their all-time favorite passages in literature,” Jim Shepard discusses Flannery O’Connor, James Joyce, and the painfully fleeting nature of epiphany:

This kind of conversion notion is based on a very comforting idea—that if only we had sufficient information, we wouldn’t act badly.

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Flannery O’Connor, Cartoonist and Chicken Trainer Extraordinaire

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Apparently, as a college student, O’Connor developed a taste for making linoleum cuts, which appeared in the college’s newspaper along with awesomely quipy captions directed at the pompousness of student life and the faculty.

Barry Moser, who is writing the introduction to the upcoming book on O’Connor’s early art, likens her linoleum technique and general temperament to her keen eye for gesture: All the poses her figures strike seem realistic, despite her rarely using references.

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