Posts Tagged: folklore

Storytelling Is a Search: An Interview with Sequoia Nagamatsu

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Sequoia Nagamatsu discusses his debut collection Where We Go When All We Were Is Gone, grief as a character, and the intersection of ancient myth and the modern world. ...more

The Saturday Rumpus Essay: No Wound

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Maybe I can touch it and show it to you. If I convince you, we can call it real. And then perhaps it will be. ...more

This Week in Short Fiction

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Some people write about dystopian futures, or reimagined folktales, or ghosts, or science fiction. Sequoia Nagamatsu, author of the upcoming story collection Where We Go When All We Were Is Gone, does it all. The debut collection, out this month from Black Lawrence Press, weaves Japanese folklore and pop culture into fantastical plots and futuristic settings to create stories that illuminate the human heart in modern times.

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Hunger is the Beginning

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Desire is transformative, and transgressive: whether it’s an unpeeled onion or a noble lover, to want something, especially for women, can never be entirely benign. A common consequence for careless appetite in fairy tales is monstrous birth– a child that is less, and more, than the mother bargained for.

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Scary Stories for a New Generation

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We haven’t stopped creating fairy tales and folklore—we just do it online now.

For Aeon magazine, Will Wiles has a splendid longread about “creepypasta,” the phenomenon of writing and disseminating scary stories on the Internet.

Their subject matter—horrific lost episodes of TV shows, malicious computer code that causes seizures—reveal how the loci of our anxieties have shifted to more technological horrors.

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Get Ready To Tell Your Kids About Prince Dung Beetle

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While the Brothers Grimm were collecting fairytales and folklore around Germany, another historian was doing the same thing.

His name was Franz Xaver von Schönwerth, and the 500 fairytales he recorded in Bavaria were only recently uncovered.

The Guardian has more on the multitude of new bedtime stories, including a translation of one called “The Turnip Princess.”

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