Posts Tagged: France

Septimania

Discovering Septimania

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I set off for Rome with my fiddle and a backpack, planning to busk as long as the tourists could stand it. ...more

Reading Mslle feature

Reading Mademoiselle Gantrel

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We squinted into the smoky room and saw ourselves on junior year abroad, frolicking on the Left Bank with artists in berets like hers. ...more

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The Rumpus Interview with Jessa Crispin

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Jessa Crispin talks about The Dead Ladies Project and The Creative Tarot, founding Bookslut, why she has an antagonistic relationship with the publishing industry, and her estrangement from modern feminism. ...more

Saeed-Jones

Guildtalk #4: The Rumpus Interview with Saeed Jones

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Saeed Jones talks about his forthcoming memoir How Men Fight For Their Lives, his new fellowship program at BuzzFeed, and making peace with the phantom. ...more

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The Rumpus Interview with Alexander Chee

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Alexander Chee talks about opera, the Wild West, and the charismatic women of 19th-century France that inspired his new novel The Queen of the Night. ...more

This Week in Indie Bookstores

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One Moore Books in Monrovia, Liberia, plans on publishing books aimed at children. The shop was founded by thirty-year-old Wayétu Moore, who fled Liberia as a refugee at the age of five.

Three years ago, Jenny Milchman launched Take Your Child to a Bookstore Day with the goal of getting children who ordinarily don’t have access to books into stores.

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Get to Know Benjamin Clementine

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Who is Benjamin Clementine? It’s a fair question to ask, considering this relatively unfamiliar artist was recently awarded the Mercury Prize (the UK’s parallel to the Grammy’s “Album of the Year”) for his album At Least For Now. The London artist, chosen over names like Aphex Twin and Florence + the Machine, dedicated his award to the victims of the Paris terror attacks.

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The Empathy of Latin America

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I can’t say I was surprised by the level of empathy my barber expressed for the victims of the Paris attacks, though I was intrigued by the empathy of a man whose daily life is so intertwined with the drug wars in Mexico, a war that has (by conservative estimates) claimed over 165,000 lives and disappeared over 27,000 people and 88 journalists, most notably Rubén Espinosa and Nadia Vera who were both savagely murdered in the Narvarte neighborhood of Mexico City earlier this year.

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A Vending Machine of Cold, Refreshing Short Stories

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Are you wandering the plazas of Grenoble, France, looking to spend a few minutes immersed in a story? But unfortunately, you left your Flannery O’Connor novel in the hotel room? No worries—Short Édition has your back. Er, your book. 24 hours a day, the publisher’s new vending machines offer up six hundred short stories, selectable in a unit of one, three, or five minute lengths.

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A Gold Medal Approval Rating

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For Hyperallergic, Allison Meier takes a look at the image management of Louis XIV’s reign as told through the medium of elaborate and intricate medals that traveled across late 17th and early 18th century Europe. On display at the British Museum are the plans, designs, and final versions of these medals celebrating Louis XIV’s reign, as well as medals made in other countries to mock his grandiosity.

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The Sunday Rumpus Interview: Patrick O’Neil

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Patrick O'Neil talks about his debut memoir Gun Needle Spoon, being big in France, the drug/recovery genre, and writing through trauma. ...more

Authors Stand with Charlie Hebdo

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As the world continues to mourn the 12 dead in Wednesday’s terrorist attack on the controversial French magazine Charlie Hebdo, satirists, cartoonists, writers, and editors have come together with PEN America to stand against the attack and bolster the necessity of free expression, even when that expression is offensive to some.

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Changing Shakespeare

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A French public library has discovered that the institution possesses a rare ‘first folio’ of the works of William Shakespeare. There are many first folios, but these earliest anthologies all contain variations in the texts. (The writing we have come to know as the definitive works have actually been pieced together by scholars who’ve researched and compared the various versions of first folios.) For example, the newly discovered folio has changes in Henry IV:

In one scene in “Henry IV,” the word “hostess” is changed to “host” and “wench” to “fellow” — possibly reflecting an early performance where a female character was turned into a male.

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French Faux Pas

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A twenty year-old French law that sought to keep the news media from promoting commercial enterprises is being newly reinforced.

This means that using “Facebook” and “Twitter” on air is strictly forbidden. This seems like a good way to stave off potential conflicts of interest, however with ubiquity having rendered these terms into (basically) general nouns, it might be difficult to find a vernacularly-fitting way around them.

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