Posts Tagged: Game of Thrones

VISIBLE: Women Writers of Color: Brooke C. Obie

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Brooke C. Obie discusses the historical basis for her debut novel, Book of Addis, writing to dismantle white supremacy, and why Black speculative fiction is integral to her survival. ...more

“Everywhere They Hurt Little Girls”: Female Revenge in Game of Thrones

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In Westeros, revenge mostly operates within the feminine realm... ...more

Dispatches from the Swamp: I Watched the Comey Hearings in a DC Bar with a Face Full of Novocaine

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All of us, at some point over the last six months, have wished in one way or another that we could be anesthetized. That we could chemically numb the parts of our brains that flare out with anxiety every time our phones (those luminous portals of dread) vibrate with a news alert.

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Wanted/Needed/Loved: Weyes Blood’s Mysterious Kris

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To this day no one really knows where my kris came from or whether or not it’s a significant part of my family history, if it’s a random object or an heirloom with an untold story. ...more

Good Girls Revolt and Female-Focused Sex on TV

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Sexual politics run through the very veins of this show. They are its blood, and they know how to get the female viewer’s heart pumping. ...more

The Rumpus Mini-Interview Project #64: Lianne Stokes

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Hi there! We’re the two brunettes who hate sex. Sara-Kate hates sex because it’s too aerobic—she once sprained her foot. She lives in Kips Bay, loves candy, and wears exclusively rompers. Elisa Jordana hates sex because she abhors the human penis and all its functions.

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The Rumpus Interview with Emily Barton

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Emily Barton discusses dieselpunk, genderqueer magic, and the collaboration between reader and writer in her latest novel, The Book of Esther. ...more

The Read Along: Jessa Crispin

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Jessa Crispin on reading abroad, watching ships chug through the Bosporus, and watching Outlander. ...more

Podcatcher #4: Getting Curious with Jonathan Van Ness

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Jonathan Van Ness discusses his podcast, Getting Curious with Jonathan Van Ness, fierceness, curiosity, and hairstyles. ...more

Winning the Game of Thrones Like a Girl

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The days of testosterone-fueled warmongering are long past. Instead, at the end of Season 6, the queens reign, stronger than ever. ...more

The Rumpus Book Club Chat with Martin Seay

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The Rumpus Book Club chats with Martin Seay about his debut novel The Mirror Thief, the Great Work of alchemy, researching optical prosthetics, and keeping plot lines straight in a 600-page novel. ...more

The Slow Fall of the Hot Heroine

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If nothing else, it’s the opinion of other women that encroaches on mine. Resemblances spark my joy; differences become character flaws. ...more

Red Dawn

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But perhaps we were like people everywhere, trying to find some meaning in our existence, and an outside threat gave us both meaning and existence. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Lidia Yuknavitch

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Lidia Yuknavitch discusses her latest book, The Small Backs of Children, war, art, the chaos of experience, and that photograph of the vulture stalking the dying child in the Sudan that won the Pulitzer Prize. ...more

The Rise of the Mega-Novel

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Serial novels are nothing new, especially in genre fiction designed to keep readers shelling out money for the next phase of a story. But the sudden, rapid success of fantasy genre series like George R.R. Martin’s Game of Thrones and the adaptation of Tolkien’s hobbit epics to the big screen has meant publishers want to cash in on the double-XL titles.

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The Saturday Rumpus Essay: Dead Girls Sold Here

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Why then are we comfortable with women routinely being cast as the victims of violence? Why don’t we see that as sexist? Where is the outrage? ...more

The Rumpus Saturday Essay: Stain

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It’s hard to remember why I was silent. Maybe, like some of the women only now reporting they were raped by Bill Cosby decades ago, I was afraid I wouldn’t be believed. ...more

Out of the Binders and Into the Refrigerators

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The success of The Magicians trilogy stems in part from its self-awareness. Lev Grossman wields his familiarity with fantasy genre fiction to critique and alter the usual formula. So why do his female characters all serve the same purpose?

…he’d almost certainly be familiar with the infamous tradition of “Women in Refrigerators,” coined by comic fan Gail Simone in 1999: It means, basically, that female characters are often killed off or otherwise grotesquely traumatized (raped, tortured, paralyzed, stripped of superpowers, etc.) to motivate angst on the part of male leads.

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