Posts Tagged: gender roles

The Rumpus Poetry Book Club Chat with Nikki Wallschlaeger

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Nikki Wallschlaeger discusses her new collection Crawlspace, why she chose to work with the sonnet form, and how segregation in American never ended. ...more

Saying What Shouldn’t Be Said: A Conversation with Julie Buntin

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Julie Buntin discusses her debut novel, Marlena, why writing about teenage girls is the most serious thing in the world, and finding truths in fiction. ...more

Out of the Trenches: The Rumpus Review of Wonder Woman

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If there was ever a case for women avoiding Botox, Diana’s signature skepticism for the patriarchy is it. She has never encountered womanhood as subordinate, and she’s not about to start. ...more

Mixed Feelings: Why Do Men Always Want to Settle Down?

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Many women do want to get married, and that’s a perfectly reasonable choice. The problem, then, is that when a woman says she doesn’t want to marry, many people find this hard to believe. ...more

Lone Star Cinema

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In clinging to a set of memories that fade more every day, maybe I’m also clinging to an idyllic version of my own past. ...more

Reading across Cultures: A Conversation with Ratika Kapur

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Ratika Kapur discusses her latest book, The Private Life of Mrs. Sharma, the disappointing romance of affairs, and how people carry on after doing the unthinkable. ...more

The Sunday Rumpus Essay: My Souls Are Out A-Wandering

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What is marriage but another form of colonization? A renaming? A power taken, a power taken away? ...more

MIXED FEELINGS: The Emotional Labor of Listening to Men Complain

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In the first installment of "Mixed Feelings," a science-based advice column, Mandy Catron offers counsel on handling a partner's obsession with their ex. ...more

Learning to Live Alone through the Legacy of Mary Tyler Moore

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Characters like Mary and Rhoda hadn't been turned into stereotypes of single women in their thirties or career women or divorcees. They couldn't be: they were the first. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Bonnie Jo Campbell

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Bonnie Jo Campbell discusses her collection Mothers, Tell Your Daughters, the natural world as a character, and finding writing from the male point of view easier. ...more

Caroline Chege Is the Politician the World Needs

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Against all odds, Caroline Chege is fighting for female representation in Kenya. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Viet Thanh Nguyen

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Viet Than Nguyen discusses his story collection The Refugees, growing up in a Vietnamese community in San Jose in the 1980s, and the power of secondhand memories. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Lauren Elkin

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Writer and academic Lauren Elkin discusses her latest book Flâneuse: Women Walk the City in Paris, New York, Tokyo, Venice and London, the freedoms and constraints of urban space for women, and the power of first person. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Melissa Yancy

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Melissa Yancy discusses her debut story collection Dog Years, using her day job for inspiration, and being “an old curmudgeon at heart.” ...more

This Week in Books: Tainted Witness: Why We Doubt What Women Say about Their Lives

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Welcome to This Week in Books, where we highlight books just released by small and independent presses. Books have always been a symbol for and means of spreading knowledge and wisdom, and they are an important part of our toolkit in fighting for social justice.

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This Week in Short Fiction

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This week, rising voice Emma Horwitz writes about teenage girls looking for some under-the-pants action (if you know what I mean (I’m talking about fingering)) at Vol. 1 Brooklyn. Horwitz’s story, appropriately titled “Fingering,” is a welcome and refreshing addition to the small range of narratives that show teenage girls as the single-minded, sex-mad creatures they sometimes are, because high sex drives aren’t just for boys, you know.

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Fitting Characters and Scripts

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Unwittingly, my mother teaches me in this conversation her generation’s word for gay: 同性恋. I look it up in an online dictionary, three characters in my mother’s tongue. Same, sex, and love. ...more

This Week in Short Fiction

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Motherhood is an all-consuming thing. The sleepless nights, the endless diapers, the undying love, the absurd tasks that must be performed to ease a baby into nap time. But time and energy aren’t the only casualties of motherhood. In our culture, motherhood often demands one’s identity as well, consumes it whole as the woman becomes a public object for fawning over, for scrutinizing, for judging whether she measures up.

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The Rumpus Interview with Vi Khi Nao

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Vi Khi Nao on her new novel Fish in Exile, why women shouldn't apologize (even when they're wrong), moving between genres, and why humor is vital in a novel full of darkness and grief. ...more

Wolves

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The men who called me names were always white men, dressed in the shirts and ties that marked them as belonging to a different class than I did. They sat down next to me when I asked them not to, they kept touching me when I asked them to stop.

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Exclamation Points Are Feminist!

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Friendly emails are a sign of progress, not weakness, in our working lives.

Policing women’s use of language is over (we wish). But at the Huffington Post, Angelina Chapin argues that women’s use of exclamation marks in the workplace represents a subversion of masculinist notions about leadership.

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The Rumpus Interview with Esmé Weijun Wang

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Esmé Weijun Wang discusses her first novel, The Border of Paradise, about a multi-generational new American family, creative expression through writing and photography, and interracial relationships. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Jane Alison

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Jane Alison discusses her autobiographical novel, Nine Island, the value of truth in fiction, and unsubscribing from romantic love. ...more

The Rumpus Review of Bridget Jones’s Baby

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Perhaps Bridget fans who watched the movies but never read the books might not find this movie to be such a hard blow... But those who read the books—and those who loved the pilgrim soul in Bridget—will feel the loss more keenly. ...more

A Man’s ABCs of Miscarriage

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I once heard the only thing faster than the speed of light is the speed of thought, and I wonder if simply thinking about Sawyer’s sister until my head hurts could get us to the place we fear talking about. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Bronwen Dickey

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Bronwen Dickey discusses Pit Bull: The Battle over an American Icon, her examination of one of the most feared dog breeds, how the media changes perceptions, and what Eliza Doolittle might have to say about this. ...more