Posts Tagged: gender

The Origin of Performativity Theory

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She made it clear that the body is not a stable foundation for gender expression.

For New York Magazine, Molly Fischer profiles gender theorist and philosopher Judith Butler, focusing on how Butler’s theory of performativity has disseminated into pop culture in the thirty-six years since its inception in Gender Trouble, and how the conversations around gender and identity politics have grown since then.

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INGLEWOOD, CA - FEBRUARY 19: Prince performs live at the Fabulous Forum on February 19, 1985 in Inglewood, California. (Photo by Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images) Prince Live In LA    
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Swinging Modern Sounds #73: Prince Rogers Nelson, Guitar Player: A Symposium

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I started thinking about additional, more slantwise ways we might talk about his legacy. What if I organized a bunch of guitar players? ...more

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(K)ink #9: Writing While Deviant: Jera Brown

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I wanted to uncover the nest of wires comprising my gender identity and describe its complicated mass. ...more

This Week in Short Fiction

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In a darkly humorous new story at n+1, Jen George questions the qualifications of being “adult,” gives thirty-somethings across the world nightmares, and packs in plenty of social criticism while she’s at it. The story, “Guidance/The Party,” follows a single, childless, career-less, 33-year-old woman who is visited by a mysterious Guide.

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The Rumpus Interview with Shawn Vestal

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Shawn Vestal discusses his new novel Daredevils, Evel Knievel, growing up in a mainstream Mormon family, and what he thinks of the American West. ...more

Book Club Misogyny

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For Electric Literature, Tabitha Blankenbiller offers a critique of the recent New York Times article about “Man Book Clubs,” and analyzes how gendered book covers influence readers’ choices and experience:

We can debate the levels of hubris and/or drunkenness in the NYT editorial room all we want, but what we have is an article claiming real estate and resources in The New York Times’ Books section.

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No Pronouns

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Using Anne Garréta’s 1986 novel, Sphinx, as a springboard, Stephanie Hayes explores the superpowers of gender-blank characters for the Atlantic. Sphinx’s recent translator, Emma Ramadan, describes how what began as an Oulipan constraint to avoid gender became a freedom from preconceived notions of male and female, and sometimes, a guessing game.

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Regarding the Boy

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What happens to a place when it can no longer define itself by its history, when it tears everything down? What is the rust belt without the plants, the factories? Who is the boy without his sister? ...more

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Total Noise and Complete Saturation

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For as long as I can remember I’ve been interested, in a clinical way, in silence. ...more

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Visible: Women Writers of Color #1: Desiree Cooper

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Desiree Cooper discusses her debut collection of flash fiction, Know the Mother, what mother-writers need, and why motherhood is the only story she’s ever told. ...more

Emily Dickinson Wasn’t Crazy

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Emily Dickinson continues to appeal to literary critics fascinated by her poetry’s terse and alarming emotional breadth. Many biographies attribute her emotional poetry to a sense of agoraphobia, but at Lit Hub, Jerome Charyn makes the case for Emily Dickinson as a more complicated and clever character who was very aware of how the emotion in her poetry would be interpreted through the lens of gender.

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Shaped by the External World

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Susan Burton profiles Dana Spiotta for the New York Times. Burton praises Spiotta’s work for its “ambitious” subject matter that explores the way we are “shaped” by the material world. In addition, the article discusses how Spiotta’s work has been gendered, and “cited in discussions about whether culture properly values the work of female novelists.”

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The Rumpus Interview with Alida Nugent

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Alida Nugent talks about her new book You Don’t Have to Like Me: Essays on Growing Up, Speaking Out, and Finding Feminism, the messiness and realness of sex and sexuality, and putting likeability last. ...more

White Women Dominate Publishing?

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Man Booker prize-winner Marlon James was right: the people who work in publishing are overwhelmingly white and female. New data shows that publishing executives, editors, and the staff behind books are predominantly white women:

At the executive level, publishing is 86 percent white, 59 percent female, 89 percent “straight/heterosexual,” and 96 percent normatively-abled.

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Swinging Modern Sounds #69: Meaning Yes

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When in need of comfort, it’s always worth trying close reading. ...more

The Ladies’ University Experience

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Donna Drucker writes for Notches on the Dean of Women’s Office at Purdue University. The Dean of Women’s Office was the late 1960s predecessor to the university’s modern-day Dean of Students role. In her piece, Drucker looks at the period-specific complaints and concerns registered by female students, and how the office addressed a wide range of issues on sexuality during this time period.

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For Men and By Men

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Slate’s Rebecca Onion and Andrew Kahn analyze the overwhelming maleness of both the subjects and authors of history books, discussing their findings with book publishers:

Our data set revealed some answers about the publishing of popular history that we expected: Authors are largely male, biographical subjects too; “uncle books” make up a third of the total titles published.

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