Posts Tagged: gender

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The Rumpus Interview with Monica Byrne

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Monica Byrne talks about sex, gender, the insidious power of stereotypes, and putting relationships between women at the center of her novel, The Girl in the Road. ...more

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The Rumpus Interview with Pussy Noir

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Jason Barnes talks about performing burlesque, genderfuck fashion, naked contortionists, and “being above gender” as his alter ego Pussy Noir. ...more

The Gender Novels

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Gender transition seems to fascinate just about everyone who hasn’t gone through it, so it makes sense that we get a lot of literary fiction on the subject . . . All these books were penned by cisgender—that is, non-transgender—authors. In that, they join a very twenty-first-century sub-genre: sympathetic novels about transition by people who haven’t transitioned.

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The Saturday Rumpus Essay: Transparent and the Evolving Culture of Shame

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There's a ray of nuclear longing at the center of Transparent... ...more

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Being Like Him: Fathers, Daughters, and Sons in Boyhood

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That scene at Antone’s plays out one of my biggest fears: that when women aren’t in the room, straight men shift their conversations. ...more

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The Saturday Rumpus Interview with Noah Berlatsky

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Noah Berlatsky on his new book, Wonder Woman: Bondage and Feminism in the Martson/Peter Comics, blogging, and reconciling feminism and bondage. ...more

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The Saturday Rumpus Essay: Falling For The Femme Fatale

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If power is going to shift toward equality, men have to see power less as an inherent right and more as something we can be incentivized to relinquish. ...more

Women Read Women

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Women read books written by women and men read books written by men, reports the Guardian. A study of Goodreads data suggests that people prefer reading books written by those who share their gender. The study also reveals that men and women read roughly the same number of books; however, women read twice as many books published in 2014 as men did.

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It Starts With People

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In Charlotte, North Carolina, a Heroes Con panel devoted to LGBT visibility in comics was hosted by Kate Leth, Bryan Pittard, Terry Moore, Eric Punzone, and Gilbert and Jaime Hernandez. The sextet spoke on internal censorship, Internet trolls, and straddling gender boundaries in print:

During Q & A, a fan asked how the panelists felt about being straight, writing gay characters, and whether they’ve been criticized for it.

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VIDA Launches Roundtable Discussion Series

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VIDA is launching a new roundtable discussion series on issues in writing by women on June 2nd at Housing Works Bookstore in Manhattan. The event is the first of a series that will take place every fall and winter/spring. This time, they conversation centers on how women write about other women, featuring a panel including Jill Lepore, Rebecca Mead, Salamishah Tillet, and Ruth Franklin.

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Talking About Oppression

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Writers who deal with oppression are as varied as the forms of oppression they face. Kiese Laymon and Leigh Stein come from two disparate backgrounds, writes Rachel Edelman in Critical Flame, but both end up critiquing gender and racial oppression in similar ways:

Laymon is a black man from Mississippi; Stein is a white half-Jewish woman from the Midwest.

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Shakespeare’s Women

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In honor of the Bard’s 450th birthday, The Millions presents us with an analysis of Women Making Shakespeare, a new anthology from The Arden Shakespeare series edited by Gordon McMullan, Lena Cowen Orlin, and Virginia Mason Vaughan. They have  a few questions about the representations of gender found in Shakespeare’s work:

The anthology contains short essays on anything related to women and Shakespeare — as characters, as actresses, as critics and scholars, as educators, as suffragists and feminists, and as readers — over the past 450 years.

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Unreliable Men

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The unreliable narrator lends a particular type of voice to a story. After breaking down unreliable narrators by gender, Elizabeth Weinberg concludes that there are differences between male and female unreliable narrators—primarily, that male narrators lack empathy.

I’m a firm believer that although most fiction isn’t autobiographical in the sense that the events of a story actually happened to the writer, writers tend to write about what they find psychologically compelling, and they tend to write about what they, on some level, know.

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Gender, literature, and criticism

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Women’s work has always been awesome, just as the work written by people of color, minorities, and other classes of people who aren’t white men has been. The work of white men has been awesome, too, but it has benefitted from a system where their work has been assumed awesome, rather than graciously granted the chance to be awesome.

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