Posts Tagged: george saunders

Short Revolution

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Great novels also experiment and innovate, but a short story can make a never-before-seen formal leap and then peace out, before you’re even sure what’s happened.

At Electric Literature, Rebecca Schiff introduces us to the authors who have revolutionized the short story in recent years.

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The Sunday Rumpus Interview: Idra Novey

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Swati Khurana talks with novelist and translator Idra Novey about the challenges and joys of translation, the idiosyncrasies of language, the inextricable reception of women's writing and women's bodies, and much more. ...more

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The Rumpus Interview with Joanna Walsh

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Joanna Walsh discusses her story collection, Vertigo, consciousness, artifice, and simultaneity. ...more

George Saunders and Donald Trump

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George Saunders! America’s greatest satirist! The heir to Mark Twain’s estate! And I thought, Oh, what I wouldn’t give to hear Saunders weigh in on Trump. And then I remembered that, in a way, he already had.

At the Kenyon Review blog, Cody Walker talks about how George Saunders‘s story “The Red Bow” can be used as a critique of Donald Trump’s mad descent into racist demagoguery.

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The Rumpus Interview with Annie Liontas

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Annie Liontas talks about her debut novel Let Me Explain You, crafting voices, and the benefits—and occasional pitfalls—of returning to get an MFA after years of writing in the dark. ...more

If Writers Were Baseball Players

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With giddiness over the National League Championship, Lit Hub imagines the amusing fantasy lineup of players if the baseball teams were made up entirely of writers. Pitting Jennifer Egan and George Saunders against Malcolm Gladwell and Alice Munro, the list is an entertaining interpretation of writers’ styles translating into athletic skill.

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The Rumpus Interview with Lincoln Michel

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Lincoln Michel talks about his debut short story collection, Upright Beasts, his interest in monsters, and what sources of culture outside of literature inspire him. ...more

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The Rumpus Interview with David Lipsky

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David Lipsky, whose book was recently adapted into the movie The End of the Tour, discusses his career as a writer and journalist as it’s evolved in the twenty years since his road trip with David Foster Wallace. ...more

Ben Marcus Glad He Isn’t An Anthropologist

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Author George Saunders interviews Ben Marcus about reading for the “mechanics” of short stories, and how to “reverse engineer” these mechanics in order to construct original work. In addition, Ben Marcus shares what he learned about the state of the “American ” short story while reading for his recent anthology, New American Stories: 

I’m pretty glad that I’m not an anthropologist whose job it is to document the patterns and currents of the American short story… American imperialism is a given, along with American greed and stupidity etc.

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Chipotle: The Next New Yorker?

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Last year Jonathan Safran Foer teamed up with Chipotle to create a line of cups and to-go bags with short stories by Toni Morrison and George Saunders printed on the side. Now the author is at it again, curating a new series of takeout literature that will include writing from Paulo Coelho, Barbara Kingsolver, as well as comedian Aziz Ansari.

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This Week in Short Fiction

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Some story collections drop with fireworks and great fanfare, while others make their entrance, it could be said, on tender feet. The latter is the case with the works of Edith Pearlman, who released her fifth story collection, Honeydew, on Tuesday.

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The Rumpus Interview with Thomas H. McNeely

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Thomas H. McNeely discusses coming of age in the 1970s, Houston's complicated racial history, and his new novel Ghost Horse. ...more

The Disappointing Grandfather

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After hailing Kurt Vonnegut as the “grandfather” on her “literary family tree,” Kathleen Founds describes the experience of reading his short story, “Welcome to the Monkey House,” at BuzzFeed Books. The experience, she writes, was “akin to opening a box in my literary grandfather’s attic and finding something utterly derailing”:

If Vonnegut could see through myths about war, why couldn’t he transcend myths about sexual violence?

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Up Next in the Rumpus Book Clubs

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There’s still time to get the December selections if you join either (or both!) the Rumpus Book and Poetry Book Clubs. What makes our book clubs special? Well, our first readers have a terrific track record of selecting truly amazing books, and members get books before anyone else does because we only select books that haven’t been released yet.

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This Week in Short Fiction

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Story|Houston published a beautiful story this week in their Fall 2014 issue, all of which centers around the theme of family, functional or otherwise. “Termites” tells the story of Tamara, aka Tam or Tam-Tam, a youngish woman living in and trying to take care of/sell her family’s childhood home on Staten Island.

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Famous Authors: They’re Just Like Us!

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For T Magazine, seven authors reflect on the experience of revisiting and annotating their early works for an upcoming PEN American Center fundraiser. George Saunders thinks his style in CivilWarLand in Bad Decline was “manic and abrupt.” Jennifer Egan still regrets that she failed to include an Epic poetry chapter in A Visit From the Goon Squad.

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This Week in Short Fiction

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Every good story is rooted in conflict, and most of us learned the different types of conflict in our high school literature classes like clockwork, year in and year out: man v. man, man v. self, man v. society, man v.

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The Funny Side of Writing

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Over at the New Yorker, read an excerpt from Mike Sacks’s upcoming Poking a Dead Frog: Conversations with Today’s Top Comedy Writers. The selection features an interview with George Saunders, in which the writer talks about his upbringing, getting inspiration for characters from working in a restaurant, Mark Twain, comedy, and humor versus satire.

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The Girl with the Hair in Her Mouth

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“What I regret most in my life are failures of kindness: those moments when another human being was there in front of me, suffering, and I responded sensibly. Reservedly. Mildly,” George Saunders said in his 2013 commencement address at Syracuse.

The New York Times printed the speech and it has, since then, raked in hundreds of thousands of views on YouTube.

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