Posts Tagged: grace paley

On Joy: Three Poetry Anthologies

Reviewed By

With impermanence and “praise for the devil” all around, it’s a gift to rediscover joy, no matter how fleeting.

...more

Notable NYC: 5/27–6/2

By

Saturday 5/27: Hossannah Asuncion and Che Gossett join the Segue Series. Zinc Bar, 4:30 p.m., $5. Tuesday 5/30: Samantha Irby presents her new essay collection We Are Never Meeting in Real Life (our May Book Club selection). Housing Works, 7 p.m., $20.

...more

The Lonely Voice #32: The Last Lonely Voice

By

That’s what the Lonely Voice has always been to me. It was a privilege to be allowed to have a private conversation with myself in public.

...more

The Rumpus Interview with Rebecca Schiff

By

Rebecca Schiff discusses her debut collection The Bed That Moved, choosing narrators who share similarities with each other and with herself, and whether feminism and fiction-writing conflict.

...more

Talking Funny

By

There aren’t many things that make sense, nakedly, without justification or explanation or exposition. But George Saunders reading Barry Hannah and Grace Paley does. For the New Yorker‘s Page Turner, he leafs through Paley’s “Love,” Hannah’s “The Wretched Seventies,” and chats about the reverberations of both. And if you haven’t checked out The Rumpus Book Club’s […]

...more

This Week in Short Fiction

By

Playing off of Jerry Seinfeld’s video series, “Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee,” The Morning News introduced a new column earlier this month called “Novelists in Restaurants Eating Food.” Roxane Gay offered up the first sampling, and this Wednesday, Jami Attenburg contributed the second, “Café de la Esquina.” Should there be doubts as to the genre of the review/not review, the editors […]

...more

Political Fiction, Without a Capital P

By

Political fiction can come across as heavy-handed, but avoiding all politics in writing may overlook the fact that people lead political lives. Over at the Atlantic, author Molly Antopol talks about how reading the fiction of Grace Paley taught her to write about political characters without sounding preachy—as she puts it, political fiction without a […]

...more